Damp internal wall ...................Any advice?

P

peter1450

Hi
I have a damp problem on an internal wall, the wall is double brick thickness and seems to have been injected at some point in the past.Fortunately for me the wall thats getting damp is inside the stair cupboard so its out of site when the doors closed!
First i thought the kitchen floor in the adjoining room was to blame as this is concrete, but when they layed the concrete they left a channel for a gas pipe to run free so its not the floor bridging the wall , i can't see or feel any obvious leaks from any of the pipework or fridge(build-in) and the floor(original) doesn't feel overly damp. What else could this possibly be besides rising damp, and what can i do to cure the problem if it is?
Any advice appreciated Pete.
 
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Have you checked for leaky copper rad (or fridge) water supply pipes below floor level in that area? This could be your culprit.

I have had rising damp on all walls and so I tend not to believe you have it in only one isolated spot in your house....

How big of an area are we talking about?

My advice, having to deal with a rising damp issue and gut an entire house is remove the plaster to the brick as best as possible in area affected til brick is not as damp. Buy 2 part EPOXY PAINT on ebay for about 70 pounds. Thin with acetone and mix well. Acetone allows the epoxy to be sucked in by the brick like a sponge. Paint over whereever area is affected, 2 or 3 thick coats. Wait a day or two to dry. brick will no longer be damp and, it will be stronger vs crumbly. Bitumen over epoxy. tack in some vapor permeable membrane from b&q. Then cut foil plasterboard to fit. Do not use membrane if replastering.

1) It is cheaper than getting any damp plaster specialist in
2) You can decorate right away
3) 100% guarantee that absolutely NO damp will reappear in that space again. (maybe around it but not inside of it).
4) You can always test a small patch first to see the results before doing a whole job. Total outlay will be less than 100 pounds if you do the labor yourself.

Might sound hokey but no other damp solution really works (short of fixing a leak)... not silane cream or reinjecting and no damp company will give a 100% guarantee from the time they leave your property.

Also if you really had rising damp, the damp only rises to a certain degree where there is a tide mark. From my experience, having treated many walls with methods outlined above and leaving them bare, the brick above the tide mark does not somehow become damp from water bypassing the treated area and rising.

Hope this made some sense.



Hi
I have a damp problem on an internal wall, the wall is double brick thickness and seems to have been injected at some point in the past.Fortunately for me the wall thats getting damp is inside the stair cupboard so its out of site when the doors closed!
First i thought the kitchen floor in the adjoining room was to blame as this is concrete, but when they layed the concrete they left a channel for a gas pipe to run free so its not the floor bridging the wall , i can't see or feel any obvious leaks from any of the pipework or fridge(build-in) and the floor(original) doesn't feel overly damp. What else could this possibly be besides rising damp, and what can i do to cure the problem if it is?
Any advice appreciated Pete.
 

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