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Dehumidifiers: Desiccant or Compressor?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Radam87, 5 Jan 2021.

  1. Radam87

    Radam87

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    We tend to dry delicate clothes indoors in winter and would like to get a dehumidifier. We have a modest amount of condensation on the windows every morning except when vented - unfortunately my partner gets too cold for this during winter.

    We ideally want to use it for a few hours at a time rather than keep it on constantly.
    The main hallway it would be located in sits at around 15 degrees currently. I'm getting a hygrometer so I can get an estimate of humidity within the house. Might also put it in the conservatory occasionally. Based on this, I'm assuming that a desiccant would be best or have I misunderstood?

    - Lets say the hygrometer measured 12 - 14 C and 65% humidity - my assumption was that this isn't optimal for a compressor?

    - Only running it for a few hours per day may favour a desiccant? While the power consumption is usually double that of compressor, I've read they will remove approximately twice the amount of moisture per hour? Not sure how true that is - can this be found out from specs of the unit?

    - Alternatively - with the heating on and drying clothes - temp and humidity would likely rise to a level where a compressor might work well ... so overall not too sure which to get?

    Are there any key levels I can glean from the hygrometer to guide which type to get?

    What are the key variables to look out for? Power? throughput of air per hour? Volume of water collected per day? Operational cost per hour?
     
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  3. Ihavenojob

    Ihavenojob

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  4. Bodgedbuild

    Bodgedbuild

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    If you intend using it in a cool area the desiccant type will work a huge amount better, if the area is warm then a refrigerant type can be used. You will probably pay more for a decent desiccant type and they use more electricity as draw backs but they can extract a lot more water at cooler temperatures as an advantage.
     
  5. Bodgedbuild

    Bodgedbuild

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    At 12-14 degrees a refrigerant type will be spending a large amount of time in defrost mode, it will be very ineffective.
     
  6. Radam87

    Radam87

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  8. Ihavenojob

    Ihavenojob

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    Yes, still using it and very happy. With 2 grown up kids and 2 dogs, the washing is non stop, and as it's not the weather for hanging it outside, it has been a good investment.
     
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  9. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    I arranged several hanging lines through our utility, to use when we have things to dry in the winter. I permanently installed a compressor dehumidifier and a wall mounted desk fan, both run when cloths are drying. It has a radiator, but isn't normally warm in there. It is though an enclosed space when the door is closed.

    I have recently added an even larger fan, when there are a lot of items - I find that air circulation is important, to speed up the drying.

    It makes for a very effective drying system, able to dry a couple of machine loads at a time.
     
    Last edited: 7 Jan 2021
  10. Radam87

    Radam87

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    Did try consider a desiccant? I initially wanted to get a compressor but thought the temperatures were likely too low (below 15 degrees).
     
  11. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Too be honest, the dehumidifier was a free one sourced on Freecycle. Brand new but with an easy to fix electrical fault. My utility room in winter usually is well below 15C most of the time. I set it up with a permanent drain, it really doesn't cost much to run. With the lines fully loaded from the washer, my system dries everything overnight.

    My utility also now has a small extension, what used to be a coal store. As a useful space it was useless, very long and very narrow. I bricked up the original access door, made a new one through the side of the adjoining utility, then installed wide deep shelves at either side, to make a massive pantry which is always cool.
     

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