Dewalt dw622 router slow/difficult to retract after plunge

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Router : Dewalt DW622

I'm not sure if this is in the right section, but I have a question about a DW622 slow/difficult to retract after plunging.

When I'm plunge routing > finished the cut > power button/switch released(power off) > plunge lock mechanism released(rotated counter-clockwise) > router fails to retract to upper most position.

When I'm plunge routing > finished the cut > plunge lock mechanism released(rotated counter-clockwise) > power button/switch released(power off) > router retracts to upper most position as normal.

Both of these results are consistent, i.e. not intermittent.

I have read on other forums that lubricating the plunge columns should fix this, is this BS? If it's not, what should I use to lubricate the columns?

BTW : I've had this router for about 5 years, and it's awesome, had zero problems with it other than the above. It has a lot of power, but not too heavy in the hands,can be used for trim routing or hogging deep mortises with the correct bits.

Thanks for any help
 
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Not BS. You do need to lubricate the columns periodically. As the previouz postsr implied you need a dry lubricant such as silicone or PTFE. In an emergency a quick spray over with WD40 folowed by a wipe down with a cloth will keep you running.

The other thing which screws up the plunge action is dropping the router which can bend the columns. In that instance you need to replace the offending column (fixed into the base with a pin)

Good router. I like mine. Never understood why they didn't catch on in the UK - not much bigger than the Elu MOF96, dust extraction on a par with Festool and powerful enough to cuy kitchen worktops at a pinch
 
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Wasn't the DW622 originally an Elu router? I seem to recall that my mate had a couple that looked very similar but they were branded as Elu.
 
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The DW621 started life as the Elu OF1e, with 1100 watts and an 8mm chuck, but was quickly renamed the OF97e (one up from the MOF96, maybe indicating its' successor?). When DW took over they called it the DW621. The odd thing is that European DW621s were 1100 watts and used the same collet as the MOF96 whilst the American market versions are rated at 1200 watts but have a completely new chuck design which accommodates maximum 1/2in shanks (this chuck design was shared with the DW616/DW618 US models and the long abandoned DW626 heavy duty router). The DW622 is basically a European market American spec DW621 withbthe same 1/2in collet capacity, but with the motor upgraded to 1400 watts. Still available in Europe, but not here for so.e reason. Maybe the price hike from the now deleted DW625e to the new DWE625e will leave an opening for it once more, who knows?

If you are interested there were/are single speed versions of the design as weĺl, the 900 watt OF1/OF97 and the DW620 (single speed equivalent of the DW621). There is no single speed equivalent of the DW622
 
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Thanks for all of the quick replies.

The only dry lubricant I could find at my local hardware store/DIY shop was graphite spray, so that's what I went with.

Just applied it to both columns and did some test runs; seems to have done the trick.

I use this router often to make rings for clockfaces of Mora clocks, so it gets used a fair bit.

Question: if you had a choice between PTFE, silicone, or graphite lube, which would you use?

I use the Milescraft circle cutting jig to make the circular rings like here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Milescraft-1219-Circle-guide-kit/dp/B0744PD3VS

This thing is the bomb for making circles, half moon/crescent shaped crowns.

Once again, thanks for all of your replies.
 
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PTFE. Silicone can contaminate surfaces which may need to be spray finished or lacquered later on (it causes a flaw known as fish eyes). Graphite can contaminate and mark light coloured materials leaving a semi-permanent grey mark (at least on some plastics)
 

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