Does caulk need to be directly exposed to air to dry?

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Hi all,

I had huge chunks chiselled out of my floorboards for asbestos removal. I am laying a subfloor on top of the floorboards though need to fill in the large depressed chissled out areas to avoid any possible stability issues in those areas. I used about eight tubes of standard flexible caulk as I need flexibility due to the heavy wear and could not find a suitable filler for this. The caulk is drying slow in this cold weather despite putting a small heater in the room.

I want to start laying the subfloor though wondering do I have to wait until the caulk is completely dry or can the caulk dry underneath the subfloor over time? Does it need direct exposure to air to dry? Cheers
 
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Air flow is more important than heat (but yes the heat does help).

Is this a wooden floor over concrete floor?

If yes, I would have considered using two pack filler. It doesn't shrink and the hardener acts as a catalyst, negating the need for airflow.

Open the windows and leave the heating on the caulk will eventually dry.
 
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Thanks oops. The wood planks are on joists as I'm on first floor flat. The caulk appears to be dry but still a bit soft as I can push my finger through it. Do you think it is dry enough to lay the plywood over?
 
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Thanks oops. The wood planks are on joists as I'm on first floor flat. The caulk appears to be dry but still a bit soft as I can push my finger through it. Do you think it is dry enough to lay the plywood over?


Sorry, I am confused. Are you using the caulk because the joists were mullered?

If they aren't too bad it may well be ok to proceed with the sub floor- I assume that will it at right angles to the old floor boards- thereby distributing the load.
 
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Not the joists but the floorboards. The Caulk is dry but if I press down on it it is soft and leaves a thumb indentation. I might have to give it a few more days before putting the plywood over it. Here is a picture that shows better of the filled in floorboards. The subfloor/plywood 5mm are two large sheets that cover the whole room. I'm hoping with the thick korlok vynil planks there isn't too much depression in the floor when weight is applied where the filled in areas are.

DSC_0007.JPG
 
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Erm, so you are using the caulk to fill the screw holes?

If yes then go ahead and lay your 5mm ply. The screw holes didn't need filling in the first place.
 
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No not the screw holes. Large chunks were chiselled out the floor board planks as they had glued on asbestos that needed removing. So these chunks were filled with the white caulk to prevent any sort of dip in the plywood floor I will be installing over. I think the caulk has dried now. It's great for this sort of thing as it is flexible. Though sinks a bit when dry so may need a second application (though can't be arsed so just plying over) ;)
 
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Ahh, I see.

Yup, I think you will be ok.

Good luck
 
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