Does oiling a worktop give this sort of finish?

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We have an exiting kitchen fitted by previous owners, we have added an island. The existing oak worktop has a very nice finish and have attached a pic of it.

Will this Howdens worktop oil (left by previous owner) give us this same finish on a new oak worktop?

I ask as we used Danish oil on a worktop in the last house and the finish was awful.

Thank you.
 

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Danish oil is generally formulated to give a matt or semi-matt finish. It was originally meant specifically for tropical hardwoods such as teak, iroko and some mahoganies which were commonly used in Scandinavian furniture in the 1950s and 60s and where a matt finish works well with the colour of the timber. Personally I doubt it will work well on a lighter, non-tropical hardwood.

A traditional oil finish, boiled linseed oil (BLO) gives a glossier finish as it cures fully (AFAIK Danish oil doesn't cure). I suspect that the Howdens oil you reference will contain a good percentage of BLO and/or possibly polymerised tung oil. There are also the so-called hardwax oils, but I only have limited experience of those to date, so I'd prefer it if someone more knowledgeable gave you info about those

Note that BLO is NOT just "linseed oil" or "raw linseed oil" it has to be specifically called "boiled linseed oil".

IMPORTANT: Boiled linseed oil cures exothermically on contact with air, so containers holding it most be sealed after use to prevent them starting to cure in the can. Because BLO cures exothermically (in other words it generates heat as it cures) you should NEVER leave impregnated cloths in bundles or scrunched up. Before discarding the cloths lay them flat outside to dry, to avoid a fire hazard. Believe it or not a rolled up ball of cloth rag soaked with BLO can catch fire! (the finish on the worktop, however, won't)
 
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You could try the Howdens stuff on the underside of the worktop and see how it appears after a few coats. Bear in mind, the original worktop may have many, many coats applied over the years and this, combined with being exposed to the air and light over such time, may be impossible to replicate even if you were using the same tin as was used on the original worktop.
 

JohnD

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I use BLO.

you apply multiple coats (wiping off any oil that has not soaked in after 10 minutes or it will go sticky if it lies on the surface)

the first few coats disappear, enhancing the grain and darkening the colour

if the colour is not right, you can use spirit-based wood dye on the bare sanded wood before applying the oil or varnish

if you keep adding more, it develops a shine and better protection. I think two in a day is the max.

you need a lot of coats outdoors, and I suppose on a kitchen worktop.

though IMO oiled wood is not suitable for kitchens.

I believe Danish Oil is just (any) vegetable oil mixed with white spirit to thin it so it soaks in and dries quicker. I believe all vegetable oils harden with exposure to air, eventually. Look at drips and runs round the spout of your cooking oil bottle and on its shelf.

and yes, I once found a smouldering oily rag in a painters cupboard at a weekend. It was glowing red in the middle. You can avoid this by wetting with water and tying in a plastic bag so they will not dry before disposal.
 
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Good (Ie Rustin, Liberon...) Danish oil is a bit more durable than pure Tung, but you do need a few coats over several days, and quite regular re-dos or touch ups. Every 6-12 months say., especially if there's something like a butler's sink.

Supposed to be longer lasting than BLO, but haven't used BLO for kitchens.

Have used DO on ash and spalted beech which are quite light. seemed to be fine.
 

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