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Domestic outdoor electrical requirements & RCD

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by tap, 13 Apr 2004.

  1. tap

    tap

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    I frequently need mains power in my garage, which being in a block some distance from the end of my garden precludes a proper permanent solution (can't dig up the car park or run a cable overhead). Currently I run an extension cable out of the kitchen window, accross the garden, over the wall at the end of the garden, across the parking area and into my garage where I have pre-wired a couple of sockets and a light. I then just join the garage to the extension reel (which has an rcd on it). I am proposing to fix an all weather socket to the other side (parking area) end of the garden wall to eliminate some of the current route of the extension cable, such that I then just have to run a short length of cable from the garage to the garden wall when I need power.
    I am proposing therefore an all weather socket at the end of the garden off of an rcd switched fused spur from a kitchen socket. From what I can see of these rcd switched & fused units, the fuse protects from overload and the rcd protects from earth faults whilst also acting as 'visible (mechanical red indicator)' switch.

    1)Is this OK - using the RCD as the switch for the spur, or should I have a (neon) switch before the RCD spur unit?

    When running the cable along the length of the garden, burying the cable is not a practical option. Therefore I propose to pin it to the inside (my side) of the garden wall. I guess it would be sensible to use armour cable, but as I know it's there (and won't cut through it) and its off of an rcd'd, switched,fused spur:

    2)Do I have to use armour cable or can I just use normal mains cable?

    Advice greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
     
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  3. ZenStalinist

    ZenStalinist

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    I believe that armoured cable is mandatory. You could use conduit, but I read that it has to be buried 70cm below the surface (can it be run above ground? I think so, but it's just a guess). The book I read that in, though up to date in most parts, was from the '80s however.

    As for the switch, fused spurs don't have to be switched anyway, it's an optional thing, so yes, the RCD switch will be fine.
     
  4. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    I would say yes to the switch. OK - so you probably won't be using it that frequently, but RCDs sre not designed (AFAIK) to be switched regularly as isolation devices, and you do want one of those, or some miscreant will steal your electricity...
     
  5. Big_Spark

    Big_Spark

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    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, and I am not sating you cannot continue what your doing or even what your proposing to do, however I would point out that it is Illegal to trail 230V mains leads across public rights of way unless extrememly strict safety procedures are adhered to.

    Where these supplies are open to vehicular traffic, they are 1000% prohibited..not discussion.

    I know that people do this all the time, and you never hear of people being prosecuted for it, but you should be aware fo the regulations when taking this type of action..and by regulations I do not mean BS7671, I mean the following..

    Electricity Supply Regulations Act
    Electricity at Work Act
    Health and Safety at Work Act
    Electricity in Public Locations Regulations Act
    Highways Act
    Civil Amenities (Electricity) Act
    Street Furniture (Electrical) Regulations Act

    These are just the ones that immediatley spring to mind.

    Now some may question a couple of those acts, but the fact is it is a public place, people doing a job of work have ready access and thus could be undertaking their job whilst encountering your cable.

    What you choose to do is your business, I am not saying it is right or wrong for you to do it, but simply making you aware of the legal ramifications.

    Oh, in case your wondering, if your cable resulted in someones death and negligence could be proved on your part, a number of those acts carry mandatory prison time.
     
  6. plugwash

    plugwash

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    how owns this car park

    is it the council?
    is it you (i presume not)?
    is it some form of owners cooperative?
    or what

    if it's not the council (the council are very unlikely to allow it it may be an idea to tak about running a cable over there permanently

    if it's the council then i get the feeling your only legal option may be to get a seperate supply to it from the rec

    as too mounting the socket for the socket install to comply with regs (ignoring your use of it with the extention cable) you should fit your rcd spur followed by a METAL switch unit

    terminate the armoured cable into this with a indoor swa galnd then run to a masterseal socket and use a outdoor swa gland to terminate to this
     
  7. securespark

    securespark

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    Forgive me if I've got the wrong end of the cable, but isn't the cable and socket going to be fixed to and on private property (ie back garden of private house)?

    At least this part of the circuit would not cause problems in that sense. Running cables across the car park is unacceptable, and you would need permission from the landlord/landowner/ res assoc. etc to bury a cable.

    I laid a cable for a rsident in a block of flats without asking for written permission. I was threatened with legal proceedings, and she (poor old bird) was threatened with eviction!

    Lst year I did another. I asked the client for a letter allowing my to do the necessary work to lay a cable, she said don't worry, I'm on the commitee. I asked for it anyway. Two months later I turn up to do the job. No letter. Can you get one? I ask. No, the chairman has gone on holiday. So I packed my spade back in the car, and came back two weeks later when the chairman returned. Client wanted to sue me for failing to do the job.

    Cheeky b*tch!!

    Some people take the biscuit.
     
  8. DIYnot Local

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