Dusk til Dawn Lamps

S

sparkyspike

Has anyone here ever fitted dusk til dawn lamps (e.g E27s with built in sensor) into a twin lampost?

I am wondering whether the operation of two low energy D2D lamps will affect each other when in close proximity. I'm assuming it won't work, but would like other opinions.

Have a look at this lamp post which is similar to what I want to fit.

Ta

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No, but why not use normal bulbs and switch via a external photo cell ?
 
S

sparkyspike

No, but why not use normal bulbs and switch via a external photo cell ?

This is option number two and probably what I will end up doing. D2D lamps will be preferable - if it would work. If no one's done it then I won't bother trying. I thought maybe if the two sensors were laterally opposed then they wouldn't affect each other.

Tbh, I've never fitted self-contained D2D lamps so I don't even know if they're reliable.

Thanks
 
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When you say sensor do you mean motion sensors ?

If yes and they are PIR ( passive infra red ) then having two sensors and lights in close proximity can cause problems. One lamp coming on or off will be a change of infra red pattern to the other lamp's sensor and could trigger that lamp. That lamp then re-triggers the first sensor and a loop occurs.

Doesn't always happen as some sensors respond only to a change due to a source of infra red moving across the sensed area. These will not normally respond to a stationary source suddenly appearing or disappearing in the area.
 
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We have those all over the Park Home site where I live and each has a Dusk-Dawn sensor and each post has two low energy lamps installed and work perfectly well.
 
S

sparkyspike

We have those all over the Park Home site where I live and each has a Dusk-Dawn sensor and each post has two low energy lamps installed and work perfectly well.

Are the lamps fitted with sensors, or is there a remote sensor which controls both? Are they not installed as per Chri5's suggestion?

There's a big difference between the two, which relates to my initial question on whether they would cancel each other out. If two D2D sensors can work in close proximity, then great.
 
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There's a big difference between the two, which relates to my initial question on whether they would cancel each other out. If two D2D sensors can work in close proximity, then great.

I'd (imagine) that the sensors in the bulbs would get confused, if a sensor turns off due to light, then radiating light from 1 bulb will be sensed by the 2nd. Thus on a twin light fitting with 2 x lamps one would always be off.

:eek:
 
S

sparkyspike

Exactly what I was thinking. I guess that since no one can confirm two D2D lamps will work, I'll stick to using a remote sensor.

I don't know how reliable these lamps are anyhow, so probably best to stick to what I know works.

Thanks for your ideas.

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Morning Spike,

I've got a couple of CFL's with inbuilt D2D sensors miunted in bulkhead fittings about 6m apart on the same wall. Seems to work ok; they come on and go off at different times as the sun advances and retreats around the corner.

I've never quite understood how they work - I can see how it turns on (when it goes dark !), but if it's lit, how does it know that the suns come up ?

I guess the answer is tied up with wavelength of the light produced compared the spectrum of natural light. Surely there must be someone here who can expand ?
 
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I know occupancy sensors with built in photocells wont power down the load due to daylight, until the room is vacated and the lights go off. This way, the next time someone enters, the sensor realises theres enough light and wont energise.

I think the outdoor ones look for variations in light pattern, obviously the suns light is brighter, and will hit the sensor at a different angle.
 

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