Expensive upgrade of incoming mains-worth it?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by indus, 27 Jun 2013.

  1. Agile

    Agile

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    Most water co's will replace old lead on their side for free if you have replaced the inside pipework!

    Tony[/b]
     
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  3. indus

    indus

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    Tony, as far as I can gather Thames Water will only replace their bit for free if it is proven there is an unacceptable amount of lead in my drinking water.

    I have applied to them to have my water tested. I'm hoping it turns out they've been poisoning me with lead all these years.
     
  4. Agile

    Agile

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    They used to replace them under what was called the Lead Replacement Program.

    Unfortunately they now add phosphoric acid to the water which builds up a non soluble layer to prevent the lead passing into the supply.

    Thats cheaper than replacing lead pipes!

    Tony
     
  5. ecowarrior

    ecowarrior

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    Forget about unvented cylinders and go for semi instantaneous hot water.

    This lot will supply 40 ltrs a minute of 60 degree hot water to run 2 baths & 3 showers at the same time ( 2 x 10 ltr + 4 ltr cold) and 3 x 7 ltr + 3 ltr cold)

    Nothing ( including CH on WC runs over 60 degrees)

    Total cost of parts under 4k


    Reheat time of buffer (250 ltr) will knock your sox off & this set up will run your central heating.
     
  6. Agile

    Agile

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    I can only think of one kind of occupiers who would want to run so many showers and baths at the same time!
     
  7. ecowarrior

    ecowarrior

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    Tony - u know I just had to do it! Waiting for the first comment to say it cant work lol. Its what the OP needs though. Perhaps he has a secret sideline?
     
  8. indus

    indus

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    Hi

    Could you briefly explain what is going on in that diagram? Does it involve a home booster pump?

    Thanks :)
     
  9. indus

    indus

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    You'll have to explain, I'm a bit slow :D
     
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  11. Dan Robinson

    Dan Robinson

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    It's an in joke from the closed section of the forum.

    This set up isn't beholden to the pressure pump, but it does generate a lot of hot water. I'll leave the explanation of its workings to Kim (ecowarrier) though if you don't mind? ;)

    It is tried and tested mind you.
     
  12. ecowarrior

    ecowarrior

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    Forget the LH boiler.

    Normal combi.
    With no draw off eventually stat in the buffer cools & calls combi to fire DHW. The anti strat pump circulates (whatever the boiler can muster) litres at 60 deg. thru the buffer & back up to the boiler till buffer satisfied then all stops.

    Call for DHW - lets say 25 lt per min. Buffer supplies then bot of tank cools & calls in combi. Lets say 10 Litres at 60 degree coming in from boiler. So 250 ltr tank lasts 10 mins & not reheating slowly - but direct by 60 deg useable watewr. So 25 going out 10 going in only 15 being used from buff. . Now u have 16 mins of water supplied at 60 degree so your 25 is nearer 40 at the tap. DHW demand stops combi reheats the buf with direct heat

    Data logger suggests putting the hot water in at the top lasts longer at 60 degrees & make insignificant time to reheat of boiler.
    Shunt pump size depends on resistance thru the boiler u choose. Boiler must be able to take hot water thru cold in. Look at the flow rates for 60 degrees from your boiler manual data..

    The job was done for a brothel. They use MOUNTAINS of hot water. The system that came out was two 35Kw on normal u/v 250 cyl - system that went in was two 36 combi with 250 buffer and the improvement was staggering.

    The break tank & booster was due to the mains not keeping up with the boilers & buffer! You won't outrun these babies! lol
     
  13. indus

    indus

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    Thanks Eco

    I'm still trying to figure the thing out, that's why I haven't replied!
     
  14. mfarrow

    mfarrow

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    A very elegant solution!

    A few questions:

    1. Is this legal in the UK?

    2. What combi's will allow a flow of hot water coming in from the expected cold mains without throwing a hissy fit?

    3. I suspect you have to size the pump to deliver, as far as possible, enough water to prevent cold coming into bottom of tank at maximum outlet, i.e. so the cold feed into tank only sees flowrate for static reheat, in the opposite direction to shown. Correct?

    4. Are they motorised valves before and after the pump, and why are they required?
     
  15. Jibbs

    Jibbs

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  16. Agile

    Agile

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    That pump is suitable for one shower supplied from a loft tank!

    This OP wants to use TWO showers and a kitchen sink and all from his mains pressurised thermal store!

    That pump is totally unsuitable for his needs!

    Tony
     
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