External Wood Paint In Cold Weather

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Hi. I need to paint some outside wood really quickly. It was already painted but looking really old, I have sanded it back and wood filled any really dodgy areas and I have the following tin of paint : https://www.diy.com/departments/ley...ite-gloss-metal-wood-paint-2-5l/330458_BQ.prd

My only concern is the temperatures in the UK during the night might get down to 5 or even 3 degrees C over the next few weeks. If this paint isn't going to be a good fit for the temperatures, is there a product I can put out there under the colder temperatures?
 
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The stated drying time for that paint is 16 - 24 hours So that wont work in the current weather conditions. There are other gloss paints on the same site with 6 hours drying time being stated. If you pick a nice day and get it on once the wood is dry it should be okay.

You may need a couple of dry days beforehand so look for a dry spell.

Why did it need to be done quickly? Selling? Tennant inspection?

If its just for cosmetic reasons slap on some decent paint once you have a dry day.
 
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They ain't lying about the drying time on that tin either. I used it for some internal wood, painted it in the morning and was still tacky nearing the midnight.

If it's just about the drying time, i'll go and check out some with the least amount of drying time. Seems obvious now you mention it and kicking myself not thinking about it like that. :p I just went and checked the wood stain I have for an external door, I did the inside the other week ok and was going to do the outside in the next week or so too but looking at the tin now it's a 48 hour drying time!!! No way, that ain't going to work so hopefully they have the same finish with a faster drying time.

Lesson learned... ask the questions before buying the materials.

Regards why it needs doing quick, the job should have been done last year so this is how overdue it is but mainly, hoping to sell very soon.
 
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If you've filled and sanded you will need a primer/undercoat first before any gloss goes on. You can get this in acrylic but even water base will be difficult to dry at the moment.
 
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The day time temperatures are higher. Just give it more dying time, rather than 1 day, give it 5.
 
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Bedec MSP would do the job, no primer needed. I used some of their Barn Black outside today, but min temp is 50F/10C so it won't dry as fast as usual.

If you have horizontal surfaces you would need to keep the dew off.
Worse if north facing.

Forget oil paint at this time of year.
 
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Bedec MSP would do the job, no primer needed. I used some of their Barn Black outside today, but min temp is 50F/10C so it won't dry as fast as usual.

If you have horizontal surfaces you would need to keep the dew off.
Worse if north facing.

Forget oil paint at this time of year.

With respect, you have that the wrong way around.

Waterbased paints cure through a process called coalescence. Basically, as the paint dries, the water evaporates off and the molecules shrink down to form a film. If the temperature drops below 5 degrees C, whilst it is still wet, the water molecules can freeze and the coalescence process fails.

Oil based paints do not contain water. They can be used in lower temperatures than waterbased paints.

You do have a good point about dew though. If I use oil based gloss during the winter months, I apply it no later than midday. Any later and the dew will dull the sheen.

Airflow can be used to speed up the drying times of water based paints (regardless of the temperature). Curing times for oil based paints can be massively increased by adding an oxidising agent such as Terebene.

By the way of an example, Dulux say that their Dulux Trade Weathershield (waterbased) should not be applied below 10 degrees. They say that their oil based should not be applied below 5 degrees (in accordance with British Standard BS 6150). I have used their oil based paint at temperatures lower than that. Admittedly, the paint becomes difficult to work with at those temperatures (it drags as you use it because it becomes thicker) so I add Owatrol Oil, along with the Terebene.
 
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Waterbased paints cure through a process called coalescence. Basically, as the paint dries, the water evaporates off and the molecules shrink down to form a film. If the temperature drops below 5 degrees C, whilst it is still wet, the water molecules can freeze and the coalescence process fails.

You do have a good point about dew though. If I use oil based gloss during the winter months, I apply it no later than midday. Any later and the dew will dull the sheen.

Airflow can be used to speed up the drying times of water based paints (regardless of the temperature). Curing times for oil based paints can be massively increased by adding an oxidising agent such as Terebene.

By the way of an example, Dulux say that their Dulux Trade Weathershield (waterbased) should not be applied below 10 degrees. They say that their oil based should not be applied below 5 degrees (in accordance with British Standard BS 6150). I have used their oil based paint at temperatures lower than that. Admittedly, the paint becomes difficult to work with at those temperatures (it drags as you use it because it becomes thicker) so I add Owatrol Oil, along with the Terebene.
Interesting, thankyou.
My experience of using oils in autumn - mainly Sikkens AZ gloss, and I'm going back ten years here - is that they take forever to dry. Days. I never tried adding terebene driers.

Last Friday I applied some Bedec waterbase as I mentioned, and it dried overnight. I wasn't out there to check the temp, but the forecast was below 50F/10C. Perhaps it had already dried before dusk.

It's not that I have any great enthusiasm for modern stuff, I use linseed in some situations, and if I were still able to use lead paint .... but after years of carefully using gloss and seeing it crack after a few years I have to admit that the water base seems to last better especially on south facings.
Indoors though, only oil, so much better for finish and cutting in.

This is where an experienced pro can score over the amateur, Owatrol, terebene, when and how much., above my pay grade.
 
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Interesting, thankyou.
My experience of using oils in autumn - mainly Sikkens AZ gloss, and I'm going back ten years here - is that they take forever to dry. Days. I never tried adding terebene driers.

Last Friday I applied some Bedec waterbase as I mentioned, and it dried overnight. I wasn't out there to check the temp, but the forecast was below 50F/10C. Perhaps it had already dried before dusk.

It's not that I have any great enthusiasm for modern stuff, I use linseed in some situations, and if I were still able to use lead paint .... but after years of carefully using gloss and seeing it crack after a few years I have to admit that the water base seems to last better especially on south facings.
Indoors though, only oil, so much better for finish and cutting in.

This is where an experienced pro can score over the amateur, Owatrol, terebene, when and how much., above my pay grade.

I too have problems with oils such as Saddolin at this time of the year. The humidity levels are the key problem. Those kinds of oils will cure faster at 10 degrees C with low humidity than 25 degrees and high humidity.
 

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