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"Faulty" downlighters ??

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by bilbrook, 5 Nov 2003.

  1. bilbrook

    bilbrook

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    I've just moved into a new house and now all those annoying problems are coming to light (no pun intended) :oops:

    The previous owner did alot of work but also went downlighter crazy in the kitchen. There must be about 16 (14 off one swith and 2 off another switch in an alcove). Sounds like a football stadium but the affect is quite good. I have two bulbs that don't work (one off both switch), so I did the obvious thing took out the old ones, put in the new ones and hey presto nothing. :mad: So I tried another new bulb again nothing, at this point I started changing bulbs with existing bulbs I knew worked in case it was the bulb and not the socket that was faulty. Long and the short of it bulbs are ok but the socket (which is one of these sealed units appears to be at fault).

    How can I check if it is the socket that these little halogen bulbs slot into are at fault as they are so small won't accept elec screwdriver (checking if there is a current)? How easy is it to replace the socket. Bearing in mind that I didn't install so working out how someone else has done something is always entertaining. Minor point the kitchen is in an extension with a pitched roof and no obvious access to roof void. It may be possible to gain access for one of the lights from the floorboards upstairs :!: (yes, only just thought of that...)

    Now for the bathroom....there are only four downlighters in there, but I regular have two of them go out after the other lights have been on for 5 mins etc, sometimes they come back on again just like that, and sometimes I have to turn the lights off and on again. Is it because there are downlighters in the bathroom? I wouldn't think so as the faulty lights are furthest away from steam etc, are they overheating and turn themselves off :?: :?: :?:

    Any help would be appreciated. :)
     
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  3. breezer

    breezer

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    in reverse order, loose connection is making the lights in bathroom go out.

    bad connection or no connection for your kitchen lights, sorry but you will have to lift the floorboards above and have a look
     
  4. bilbrook

    bilbrook

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    Thanks, at least it sounds like it should be straight forward. I'll get my crowbar out when the missus is out I think.

    Cheers :D
     
  5. loftus75

    loftus75

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    If the hologen bulbs your referring to are the little 2 pin type and not the fully enclosed type, then I may have a suggestion. I've used these type of fittings under my kitchen cabinets and they are a royal pain in the backside :mad: . The pins often fail to make a decent connection with the fitting. I discovered this after I had replaced 5 bulbs in the period of about 2 weeks. What I do now when replacing them is spread the pins, only slightly though as you can break the glass around them if your not careful. You may have to fiddle with them a bit but once you make the connection correctly they work just fine.

    Personally I'll never use this kind of fitting again, and recommend that my customers don't either as they are such a pain. However there are times when they are the only solution to lighting an area. :(

    BTW if you decide to fiddle with the bulb make sure you use a well insulated cloth or something to hold the buld, particularly if you do this with the power on, as the bulbs get instantly very hot and will burn your fingers.
     
  6. loftus75

    loftus75

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    If the hologen bulbs your referring to are the little 2 pin type and not the fully enclosed type, then I may have a suggestion. I've used these type of fittings under my kitchen cabinets and they are a royal pain in the backside :mad: . The pins often fail to make a decent connection with the fitting. I discovered this after I had replaced 5 bulbs in the period of about 2 weeks. What I do now when replacing them is spread the pins, only slightly though as you can break the glass around them if your not careful. You may have to fiddle with them a bit but once you make the connection correctly they work just fine.

    Personally I'll never use this kind of fitting again, and recommend that my customers don't either as they are such a pain. However there are times when they are the only solution to lighting an area. :(

    BTW if you decide to fiddle with the bulb make sure you use a well insulated cloth or something to hold the buld, particularly if you do this with the power on, as the bulbs get instantly very hot and will burn your fingers.
     
  7. bilbrook

    bilbrook

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    Thanks alot, at least that sounds like an easier option to try before I get to work with the crowbar! :p
     
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