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Fence post advice?

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by flashbang, 17 Apr 2004.

  1. flashbang

    flashbang

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    I'm currently replacing the fence in my garden, and because I want to make life easier in the future, have decided to go for the concrete posts and panels that slide in... My problem is that the garden is on a slight slope, and the wife wants the posts to be all the same height. I've started with holes approx 2' 6" deep so only 5'6"" is sticking out of the ground, but..... I have mis-measured :oops: and now find that I can only put about 1' 4" in the ground... I assume that 9' posts are unavailable (and I've bought 8' now anyway!) Could I still dig a 2' hole and then support the post when filling with concrete?. This would mean a block of concrete 2' deep, but only 1'4" of post stuck in it. I know the posts are supposed to be buried 2' deep, but I'm hoping the concrete will basically stick to the post and effectively lengthen it!!!
    Alternatively, has anybody got any better ideas on how to support the post properly???
    Thanks in advance for any advice.
    Flashbang.
     
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  3. breezer

    breezer

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    could you not see if you can get 1 longer post?

    friend of mine has what you have, he doesnt like it, the slot in panels bow and "pop out" he suggests (as he is doing) get good quality panels. he also tried "packing in a panel" big gust of wind some months later, the packing and frame were fine, but the inside "guts" of the panel got blown completely out, so he was left with two posts and an empty wooden square
     
  4. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Hi Breezer.
    I have not tried, as yet, to find a longer post. It would seem the most logical thing to do, but I have never seen a post longer than 8' in any fence, garden or building suppliers. I thought I would phone somebody like Jewsons (I have checked their website to no avail) but I'll have to wait till Monday to do that and I wanted to crack on with this job now...
    With regard to the panels blowing out, I can see the potential for such a disaster, but my neighbour put up this type of fence over a year ago, and has had no problem..... It's a bit late to change my design now anyway. I'm stuck with it.!!
    Thanks.
    Flashbang.
     
  5. DAZB

    DAZB

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    Can you slot your concrete post into one of these ?
    here
    It should give you the extra support you need.
     
  6. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Thanks for your input.
    Unfortunately, I don't think the metpost is available in the size needed to support a concrete post approx 4.5" x 4". I think they are designed specifically for a 3" wooden post....
    It's something I will check out though.
    Thanks again.
    Flashbang.
     
  7. Aletank

    Aletank

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    I bought a 9ft concrete fence post last year, I wanted the end one to go that extra foot for support as i was hanging a gate from it.
    I've just checked the price list from the place i got mine and they stock - 7"9 - 9" and 10" posts.
     
  8. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Thanks Aletank.... the question I have to ask is: Where did you got your 9' fence post?

    Thanks.
    Flashbang.
     
  9. Aletank

    Aletank

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    A&B Fencing,
    Birchill Road,
    Kirkby Industrial Estate,
    Liverpool
    L33 7TD
    0151 546 1007/546 6969
    Fax 0151 549 1090
    www.fencingsuppliers.co.uk
    Email: supplies@abfencing.co.uk

    Last years price for 9" post (2way) was £7.75 - Not sure how far they would deliver etc.
    I would of thought a local fencing supplier or builders merchanct would be able to get hold of a 9" post or even have them in stock !!
     
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  11. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Many thanks Aletank.
    I have not had the chance to ask my local building/fencing suppliers today. (Mon) I have never seen a 9' post, however until now, I have never looked for one!! I got all my fencing from Jewsons, and all the fence posts were together in an area of their yard. If they stocked a 9 footer, I feel that's where it would have been. At least I now know such a thing exists, and I won't rest until I've found one.
    I live in Kent, so delivery from Liverpool is out of the question, but I'm sure I'll find what I need.
    Many thanks again.
    Regards Flashbang.
     
  12. David P

    David P

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    it seems to me that if you are going to cement in the post you have it will effectively be lengthened to the desired length when the concrete sets.

    just make sure you make a good mix and perhaps try to key the post a bit with a chisel. if the mix is strong they will become virtually a solid unit.
     
  13. flashbang

    flashbang

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    That's exactly what I thought. Just because there's only one foot of post in the ground, doesn't stop you digging a two foot hole, and making the whole thing a solid block of concrete.
    My only concern is that all fencing companies and information on fencing, tells you two bury two foot of post in the ground. I'm simply not sure why.!

    I can see that the post would be weaker, just by the extra leverage that could be applied by have 7 foot out of the ground. But it would still only snap at ground level, and therefore would have the same strength as a 9 footer with 7 foot out of the ground.... :confused:
    Flashbang.
     
  14. David P

    David P

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    I guess the fencepost companies have to cover themselves for when people just stuff some drymix around the post and call it concrete - I think that as long as you do a good measured mix of concrete that is slumping just the right amount (a bit runny but still stays on a trowel - wetter than mortar) and take precautions not to let it dry out too soon or stress it for the week that is required for full set - then it will grab the post as though it were part of it.

    most mixes fail because they are starved of water while they are setting (perhaps worth lining the hole with polythene) keep it wet by pouring water on for a few days after it appears to have set and cover the top with plastic. also a good idea to try and vibrate out some of the air, but not too enthusiastic or the aggregate will sink.
     
  15. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Interesting tip about delaying the drying action. I was unaware of that. My mix is never too dry, but I let it set on it's own. I'll keep this in mind when I fit the final post, hopefully this weekend. I'll keep it dampened.
    I don't have any equipment to vibrate though, is there a poor man's equivalent?
    Thanks again.
    Flashbang.
     
  16. David P

    David P

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    if you were casting it in a mould banging the side of the mould would be enough - so perhaps try a few minutes of fast light tapping on the post itself - to send some shockwaves through the mix.

    Although I do have a friend that casts very fine items ( he has made a canoe from reinforced cement ) and he went and got a cheap v******r from an 'adult shop' for small stuff it worked a treat. but you would probably need a 2 foot long one lol :oops:
     
  17. flashbang

    flashbang

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    Yeah, like my Wife won't mind if I borrow that....
    I'd sooner nick her car!
     
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