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Fitting a fire door in to an existing frame

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by Jtbrown, 7 Jul 2020.

  1. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    If you have well fitting solid timber doors B control may accept retaining these with the addition of additional hard wired smoke detection to all rooms opening onto the stairwell. Its a policy that was agreed by the District Surveyors assoc and most local authorities will accept this as an alternative top the approved document.
     
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  3. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    True, but once again, some BCO are over the top and ask for fire doors AND linked wired fire alarm with battery back up.
    Frankly, as a carpenter I would walk away from the job you intend to do, I wouldn't even quote it.
    Sometimes you have to accept that things need replacing.
    There are inexpensive fire doors that will not look bad at all and all in all will cost you around £250 fitted each.
     
  4. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    The approved doc requires fire doors and hard wired interlinked smoke detection on each floor landing.
    The DSA policy allows you to keep the ex doors with the proviso they are in good condition, well fitting and solid timber with ADDITIONAL detection in all rooms leading directly into the stairwell.
    ALL loft conversions are required to have smoke detection the DSA approach is to provide additional detection, there are NO circumstances where a loft conversion can be carried out without some form of detection.
     
  5. denso13

    denso13

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    I agree with the quote below. It isn't just a box ticking exercise, it could be a life saver one day.

     
  6. paulrockliffe

    paulrockliffe

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    Is there a link or some more info on the DSA Policy?

    I'm in the same position, kicking myself that I didn't fit the 45mm frames 7 years ago when I renovated the house as I always intended to convert our loft. My frames are solid oak, some 180mm deep, they really don't want to come out. I'm confident I can trim them insitu with a combination of a router, a sharp chisel and about a day per door. I have 5 to do. I'm also considering new architraves that incorporate the extra 10mm of depth, that might be simpler. I also looked at Envirograf coatings for the doors.

    I did fit mains powered detection with battery backup in ever room and have done the same in the loft, so if there's a way I can safely rely on that and leave the chisels in my workshop that would be great! I will need to change the glass on two of the doors whatever, but if I can keep my doors that would be mega.

    Will I need to fit intumescent seals whatever I do and is there a relatively simple option for these that is designed for retro fit?
     
  7. Jtbrown

    Jtbrown

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    I'd be interested to see if anyone has a solution for this too. I've also renovated all of the rooms in my house, and installed mains interlinked fire alarms. Hence my hesitation to rip out the frames and re-plaster, paint / wallpaper the joining walls.

    I've seen that you can get surface mounted seals (no idea if they're any good or easy to install)
    https://www.safelincs.co.uk/fire-do...ntumescent-fire-and-smoke-seal-kit-product-1/
     
  8. Gary111

    Gary111

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    hi I know this is an old thread but do you cover manchester ?
    if so Id be interested in a quote for fire doors
     
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  10. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    No, I'm in London and happily retired.
    Those fire doors are heavy!
     
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  11. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    For the benefit of previous posters, the easiest way to remove a frame is to find the screws or nails holding it and work from there.
    If not possible, remove the architrave, assess the thickness of the frame, set your circular saw to that depth and cut a 6 inch section in the middle of the sides, AVOIDING SCREWS AND NAILS.
    Then the rest will be easily done with a crow bar.
     
  12. crank39

    crank39

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    Or put a recip straight down each side
     
  13. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    What's a recip?
     
  14. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    Reciprocating saw. Brilliant bit of kit, I bought one recently more for classic car work though, Cut up a knackered body tub into small pieces to fit in the back of the Astra in no time, would have took hours longer with angle grinders, axes etc. Should have got one 30 years ago.
     
  15. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    I know what a reciprocating saw is.
    I didn't know the short version of its name "recip". :rolleyes:
     
  16. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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