1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Fitting a shower pump

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by scottpetrie, 29 Jul 2020.

  1. scottpetrie

    scottpetrie

    Joined:
    16 May 2014
    Messages:
    329
    Thanks Received:
    5
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi
    I would like to fit a shower pump for my bathroom shower which is gravity fed. I live in a bungalow & the supply to the shower comes down from the loft. The hot pipe comes from the hot tank in the airing cupboard, goes up through loft, along then back down to shower. The cold pipe comes straight from tank in loft. They both run parallel with each other in the loft before going down the inside of the wall to the bathroom. Could I just cut into these two pipes & put the pump in the loft? Also, where could I tap into an electrical supply from?
     
  2. muggles

    muggles

    Joined:
    28 Oct 2005
    Messages:
    13,334
    Thanks Received:
    3,073
    Location:
    Daventry
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Check the pump manufacturers instructions but generally speaking they'll want it a minimum of 1m below the base of your loft tank to prevent it sucking air in. Realistically this means that you'll need to put it in your airing cupboard.

    You need to take the pump supply off a ring main circuit.
     
  3. Sponsored Links
  4. scottpetrie

    scottpetrie

    Joined:
    16 May 2014
    Messages:
    329
    Thanks Received:
    5
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Okay so if its in the airing cupboard, would I have to tee in where I said earlier, but run pipes back down to pump, then back up to re-connect where I teed in?
     
  5. oldbuffer

    oldbuffer

    Joined:
    6 May 2010
    Messages:
    1,434
    Thanks Received:
    535
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    1. Shower pumps require dedicated hot and cold feeds, so you can't just tap into existing pipes.
    2. The best place for the pump is at the base of the hot water cylinder (HWC).
    3. Check the manufacturers' specifications to determine whether you need a negative head pump or not. You must actually check, but as a guide line, if the shower head in its normal position is less than 600 mm below the base of the cold water storage cistern (CWSC) in the loft, then you are very likely to require a negative head pump.
    4. The cold feed from the CWSC must exit the cistern below the level of the feed from that cistern to the HWC.
    5. The hot feed from the HWC must be air free. This normally means using a special flange (e.g. Surrey, York, Warix) in the HWC. If the hot feed from the HWC rises at an angle above the horizontal, then a tee cut into this and pointing downwards may suffice, but again, check manufacturers' specifications.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  6. Sponsored Links
  7. SalamanderPumps

    SalamanderPumps

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2018
    Messages:
    11
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page