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Fix / re-position victorian rope-top edging

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by JimDogweed, 2 Oct 2020.

  1. JimDogweed

    JimDogweed

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    Hi.

    We have some old victorian rope-top edging in our front garden. Over the years, some of the pieces of edging have moved (pushed away from the path).

    What's the best way to secure these in the right place - someone has suggested a dry concrete mix.

    I'm looking for the simplest solution - not looking to remove and re-position all of them.

    Cheers!

    IMG_2137.jpg
     
  2. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    When I was a kid, we had that at home.
    From dim memory, you'd find it quicker to do the lot. Adjusting them one by one will take ages and still look wonky.
    I would use a sandy dry mix as you don't want it so strong that it sticks to the tiles and ruins them
     
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  4. SFK

    SFK

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    Last time i did this I cheated to get them all in line.

    I Pulled them all up.
    Cleared a channel where i wanted them.
    Put in this channel a length of roof batton wood.
    Placed the edging directly on top of the wood in a line.
    Put my mortar (sharp sand and cement mix) against side of edging to hold in place.
    Covered with soil.

    I am sure wood will rot, but will not go anywhere and makes straight line and same height easy.

    Note that in my case I did want to stick mine down as they are in my front garden and did not want them lifting/nicking. So in my case I was happy to have mortar sticking to the lower areas of the edging.

    (Suppose if you do not have the tools you could also use a line of PostCrete. Put it in dry next to the the edges and water it).
    SFK
     
    Last edited: 2 Oct 2020
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  5. JimDogweed

    JimDogweed

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    Some of them seem pretty well stuck - if I can remove them, I will, but don't want to damage. Some are already cracked though.

    I had thought about using postcrete. That could be a good idea. Cheers.
     
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