fluorescent what colour is best for working under?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by happyhero, 9 Sep 2013.

  1. happyhero

    happyhero

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    Hi, I have a shed where I do a fair amount of carpentry, what would be the best colour fluorescent tube to get for this sort of thing, daylight white or warm white?

    I see some just say white, do you know what kind of white these are likely to be?

    Any help appreciated.
     
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  3. Iggifer

    Iggifer

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    i personally like 865 which is 'daylight' 840 is 'warm white'

    'white' could be in the middle, or still 865, it's anyones guess without the colour code
     
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  4. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Daylight is probably the best.

    If you have any power tools then use high frequency ballasts as ordinary flourescent lamps pulse on and of 100 times a second and this can have a stroboscopic effect on rotating saw blades making them appear stationary or very slow moving.

    Or use incandescent work lights to illuminate such machinery.
     
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  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    That's standard advice, which I've actually heeded myself, but I have to say that those who are at any risk from the stobe effect on circular saw blades must either be very deaf or else have much quieter saws than I've ever met!

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  6. ricicle

    ricicle

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    They might be wearing ear defenders !!
     
  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    True - I hadn't considered that!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  8. happyhero

    happyhero

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    cheers guys, now you mention the numbers I can see that the white is 835 but what does that mean.... even warmer white? if so why call it white?
     
  9. Iggifer

    Iggifer

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    well technically it's still white! They could be more descriptive though
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I guess there has to be some reason (that has so far escaped me!) for having these codes, rather than just using colour temperature, but the codes appear to be the colour temperature (K) divided by 100, then plus 800:

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. plugwash

    plugwash

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    I suspect the advice originated from a factory environment where in the general noise of the place it would be easy to miss the noise of any one machine or part of machine.

    In a one person garage/workshop the risk would be much lower both because you could hear the machine and because having only one person working removes miscommunication from the possible hazards.

    I'd still fit the HF gear though..........
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed - although, as has been pointed out, there is the possible complication of 'ear defenders', even in the home.
    As I implied, I already have done!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    Ear defenders do not block out sound entirely!

    Nozzle
     
  15. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    What if you're already half deaf from years of exposure to the ringing of circular saw blades, and the whine of planers etc? :LOL:
     
  16. Spark123

    Spark123

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    What if you are in a workshop where there is more than 1 machine operating?
     
  17. cozycats

    cozycats

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    v slightly O/T, A light which gave the strobe effect could be really useful on machines such as spindle moulders. The blades on those go so fast you can't see them, and the temptation to stick a finger in to see if they are really there is frighteningly strong, as will several 8-9 fingered carpenters I've known will confirm :( :(
     
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