Foundations for a stone shed

Discussion in 'Building' started by markrryan, 2 May 2020.

  1. markrryan

    markrryan

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    Morning guys,

    Can any of you advice me whether or not I'll need to put foundations in for a stone shed I am thinking of building? The shed will be approx 1500mm (l) x 900mm (d) x 1200mm (h) with a York stone roof on top.

    I have a concrete paving slabs (450mm x 450mm x 32mm) on which I was thinking it would sit but am now wondering if it'll be too much for that.

    Any advice is appreciated.

    Mark
     
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  3. noseall

    noseall

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    Are you building a mausoleum?
     
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  4. markrryan

    markrryan

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    Haha, I might need it upon completion.

    It's £200 for the stone and my woodshed it knackered.
     
  5. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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    Think you will need proper foundations with a yorkstone slate roof.
     
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  6. nickjb

    nickjb

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    Depends on your ground conditions. I'd say you probably do but there are plenty of 200 year old stone buildings just sitting on dirt. I suppose you are trading off doing a load of extra work now against a potential load of remedial work in the future.
     
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  7. noseall

    noseall

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    Well laid slabs would be ok.

    A concrete pad would be better.

    A dedicated foundation the actual size of the shed would be the best.
     
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  9. markrryan

    markrryan

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    Thanks for your advice guys.

    I had my old van stored on the paved area for a year, when it was finally moved there were no signs of any movement so I do believe it is well laid.

    Can any of you give me an idea of how deep the foundations should ideally be (if I go that route)?

    When I went to look at the shed/outbuilding, I noticed it was a double skin wall, with bricks inside. The existing dimensions are 1800mm (l) x 1500mm (d) x 1800mm (h) with a single slab of York stone as the roof. Do you think a single skin will be sufficient where the dimensions are smaller at 1500mm (l) x 900mm (d) x 1200mm (h)? If a single skin alone is not adequate are there any other options I could explore? My feeling is that a double skin will take up too much internal space.

    Mark
     
  10. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Form a 4 or 6" concrete slab, and single skin wall would be fine. You would need to remove all topsoil to a depth where the subsoil is firm as this is the important bit. If this is more than 6" then you could infill with hard core and whack it down. Or lay the concrete and then lay your slabs on top (and within the wall perimeter) to get to the right level.
     
  11. markrryan

    markrryan

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    Thanks Woody.

    My concern was that the single skin wall would strain under the weight of the stone roof (approx 50mm thick), but this is obviously not an issue? For what it takes it's probably work using foundations.

    Mark
     
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The walls are not a problem. As always, it's the foundation that matters as that is what moves
     
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  13. markrryan

    markrryan

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    Cheers Woody,

    Having taken up the paving slabs and cleared away the sand bed there see there is a concrete bed approximately 60mm thick, in your opinion could I use this as part of the foundation and bring it up another 40-50mm or would I have to take it out completely and start again? It's difficult to say how firm the ground is under the existing concrete, having drilled through it with a 24mm SDS bit once through the bed the bit works through the ground easier, but I'd expect this.

    Mark
     
  14. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Normally with a slab or raft foundation, the perimeter is thickened to allow for (and prevent) the potential for shear cracking due to the wall load on the edge of the slab.

    It's difficult to say without knowing how good the ground is or what the concrete is like. It's a chance. It may be OK or may not. You could potenntially reinforce the overlayer, or slightly underpin the perimeter, but then that is a bit of messing about.

    You could certainly look at the ground by digging at the side and see if it topsoil or something a bit firmer. But its still a judgement call from the man on site. :cautious:
     
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