Garden room planning queries

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Funtimes, 16 Nov 2020.

  1. Funtimes

    Funtimes

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    Guys sorry if this has been done to death but I couldn't quite find an answer on google and wondered if anyone here could help please?

    I'm planning on building a garden room next year, I'd like it to be at least 3 metres wide but my garden is only 6.7 metres wide. As my garden is quite narrow I'd also prefer it to be off to one side rather than in the middle, lastly I'm rather tall so the 2.5 metres total height allowed by PD wouldn't work for me. So I wondered:

    1. If I went for planning permission to put it less than 2 metres from a boundary, do all neighbours either side and behind get consulted or would it only be the neighbours whose boundary it its close to? I'm pretty sweet with the neighbours on one side, other side are hit and miss and behind are an unknown quantity

    2. If I were to dig down 30 cms and build it slightly sunken would this get round the 2.5 metres height limit near to the boundary? (I appreciate this may be a non starter due to damp/drainage)

    3. One of places in the garden I would like to build it on it on a bit of a slope so there is about 25cm difference in ground height over 5 metres, is the building height measured from the lowest or highest ground? I read a thread about decking on here that said the height is from the highest point of ground, does this ring true for buildings as well?

    Cheers in advance for any help.
     
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  3. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    1. For formal Planning applications, LPA’s would notify ‘at least’ those properties that share a boundary with yours.

    2. I am pretty sure excavating to reduce levels as you mention would constitute operational development of which is not PD. The reduced levels also come with their added waterproofing measures. Not really worth the additional costs for the sake of 300mm.

    3. The height is measured from the natural ground level of which on a sloping site is the highest part of which adjoins the proposal as per Page 6 of the Technical Guidance (https://assets.publishing.service.g...e/830643/190910_Tech_Guide_for_publishing.pdf).
     
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  4. Funtimes

    Funtimes

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    Hi DevilDamo, thank you so much for your really helpful and detailed response. I'll give it a bit of thought if planning permission or doing it away from the boundaries is the lesser of two evils.

    Cheers
     
  5. Nakajo

    Nakajo

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    I don't think digging down 30cm would constitute operational development.
     
  6. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Yes you can lower the internal floor to gain the head height internally, as long as the external eaves the required height for PD. This is within the excavation required to build the shed, so it's not as if you are building a basement.

    But the 2.5m height criteria relates to eaves not whole roof height. Sloping roof.
     
  7. Get a transportable building - counts as a mobile home and can be up to 3.05m high internally.
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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    Surely it use would be far more controlled with extremely limited use and need to comply greater "storage " restrictions and far more likely to cause maximum friction with those around you ??
     
  9. Apparently not.

    Im too scared to post links but if you google 'caravan act' you'll find lots of info.

    But as for friction yes indeed, but that has nothing to do with planning.
     
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  11. big-all

    big-all

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    i wonder if its a cynical way to ease the housing shortage ??
    already in council accommodation any room can be classified as a bedroom providing other conditions are met
    for example, your front room and dining room can be classified as bedrooms providing you can get a table and chairs in the kitchen as a seating area that complies to certain standard to give you the required "dining and relaxation " space ??
     
  12. Jay_M

    Jay_M

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    I've just seen another post about this Caravan Act. Looking to learn more about it - but wondering why someone would be scared to post links?
     
  13. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Yeah Caravan Act. So useful but so scary to post links, and if you google, the "loads of information" is the legislation followed by some random crap.

    I've heard it mentioned twice now, since 2006. Both times on the same day. It must surely be a thing that the gypsies want kept to themselves.
     
  14. Because I recently got banned for spamming when all I had done was to post a link to site with information which was relevant to the topic being discussed. It wasnt my site, or a family or friend one, I dont work for them, it wasnt a competitor to DIYnot, nothing wrong with it at all. I got that resolved, but despite asking in emails and PMs 2 or 3 times for some guidance on what sort of links are/are not allowed, how to avoid trouble again Ive had no replies, so all I can do is not post links.
     
  15. You seem to think that explanatory information on the sites of established companies who sell transportable buildings is random crap. How very odd.

    No, its an actual law which relates to the installation of transportable buildings in gardens, so possibly of interest to the poster. It may also have provisions of interest to gypsies/travellers, but that doesnt affect the relavance to the poster.
     
  16. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Since when is a garden room a caravan or even transportable?

    Allow me to link you
     
  17. Jay_M

    Jay_M

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    I suppose if it's been designed to comply with the definition of a caravan according the legislation, it seems it wouldnt need any building regs or planning approval, so it could be a viable option for someone
     
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