Garden wall bridging water course

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Hello,

I live in a Victorian terraced house with an injected damp course. I am pretty sure the brick boundary wall in the garden is bridging the damp course and causing quite significant damp on the inside of the house.

My question is what is the solution? Does the garden wall need need to be partially demolished and rebuilt with a small gap or membrane built in, or is there amore clever solutions?

And secondly, who do I need to get to do it i.e. general builder, damp specialist?

Many thanks
 
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post some photos please, of both walls and the point where they join, and of the damp patches and the wall and other features nearby (inside and out).

Examine your house wall carefully for the original DPC, which in a Victorian house is likely to have been a double layer of slate in the mortar bed about nine inches above where the ground level used to be when it was built.

If damp is getting past it, there is a defect that needs to be rectified.

Chemical injections do not repair building defects. Do not allow anybody who sells them into your home.
 
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in a Victorian house is likely to have been a double layer of slate in the mortar bed about nine inches above where the ground level used to be when it was built.

Slate dpcs are usually only found in higher-quality 19th-century houses; the vast majority had no dpc because dampness from the ground was rarely a problem in the old days.
 
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Slate dpcs are usually only found in higher-quality 19th-century houses; the vast majority had no dpc because dampness from the ground was rarely a problem in the old days.
True and that's because they had flags layed on earth.
 
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Slate dpcs are usually only found in higher-quality 19th-century houses; the vast majority had no dpc because dampness from the ground was rarely a problem in the old days.

until 1875?

It must vary by the town or district you live in.
 
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Yep no damp course for me which I understand to be pretty normal also. Also as I said in the original post I believe the problem is the external garden wall bridging the injected damp course so wouldnt help my anyway!

Sorry cant seem to upload photos, I keep getting a security error.
 
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True and that's because they had flags layed on earth.
Agreed, but there are a great many late-Victorian houses - working-class and lower-middle class - built without damp-proof courses. In larger houses with cellars, the ground floor was often sufficiently above ground for the wall to air off before damp had a chance to rise to the floor timbers.
And one big advantage in the days when coal was cheap was that most houses had at least one coal fire burning in the range for most of the day for heating and cooking. Not only did this help to keep the stucture warmer (and hence drier) but the large volume of air drawn in by the fire would also tend to dry off any dampness in the walls.
 
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Your boundary wall- how good is the pointing and capping on it?,( If its anything like the wall at my old place it'll be fairly poor).
If there is no flaunching (top courses overhanging) or coping stones, is there scope to put some on (they'll help reduce the amount of water in the wall).
The dpc lot should have stitch drilled holes and injected up that joint, there are DIY injection kits available (check whether your house is lime mortar, the creams are different), i've used some & they seem to work.
 

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