Gas Boiler Servicing : Advice Please!

J

Job123

I have an gas boiler that is over 25 years old:
Potterton Kingfisher RS 50 CAT 1N
G.C. No. 41-601-49

Pump is an Grundfos Selectric 4, Type 40-507/130
45W output, 240V, 1 phase, 50 Hz

It supplies 7 radiators and the hot water tank.
Thermostatic radiator valves are fitted on 6 radiators.

I want to give the system a full service but need your expert advice.
Downloaded Potterton Maintenance Guide and looks as if all that needs doing is removing deposits from main burner assembly and heat exchanger plus checking burner pressure is 13 mBar. I can do the cleaning part but don't have a pressure gauge.

Please advice on what kind of a brush I need to use. Wire brush or a stiff paint brush?
It is absolutely necessary to check and adjust the pressure? Can it be done by looking for the best blue colour flame?

I also want to flush the system, fill with an inhibitor and add an additive to prevent/stop leaks.
What are the best products for these?

It is in a flat. To drain the system, I can not run a hose to outside.
So need an inexpensive pump. Is a pump driven by an electric drill good enough?
Any particular make suitable for hot water?

Any other tips and advice?

Many thanks :)
 
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We dont give advice on illegal gas work on this forum.

The advice is to either start an apprenticeship so that you can learn whgats involved and get the relevant assessments.

Alternatively to get a professional to do it for you both properly and safely!

Tony
 
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You should not use just any old brush. In order to avoid damaging the expensive burner, most of use "artist's" brushes made of RED sable hair. Do not use the light colour variety; it is not stiff enough to remove dirt adequately. NEVER use synthetic brushes; synthetic "hair" is combustible and can create a fire hazard near open flames.
For measuring the burner pressure, you need what is called a u-gauge. As you are in a flat, you will need the bigger model, not the standard 300mm version.
 
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expertgasman

bengasman";p="1957239 said:
You should not use just any old brush. In order to avoid damaging the expensive burner, most of use "artist's" brushes made of RED sable hair. Do not use the light colour variety; it is not stiff enough to remove dirt adequately. NEVER use synthetic brushes; synthetic "hair" is combustible and can create a fire hazard near open flames.
For measuring the burner pressure, you need what is called a u-gauge. As you are in a flat, you will need the bigger model, not the standard 300mm version.[/quote
bengasman";p="1957239 said:
]


Ben. Naughty boy! You're not supposed to give gas advice!
 
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Beaver hair is best preferably from a welsh virgin.....if you can find one :?:
 
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For measuring the burner pressure, you need what is called a u-gauge. As you are in a flat, you will need the bigger model, not the standard 300mm version.

That is inappropriate advice to be giving which may encourage a DIYer to buy a longer U-gauge and do it himself.
 
E

expertgasman

For measuring the burner pressure, you need what is called a u-gauge. As you are in a flat, you will need the bigger model, not the standard 300mm version.

That is inappropriate advice to be giving which may encourage a DIYer to buy a longer U-gauge and do it himself.


Jeez, Tony. I actually think you are serious! Anyway, as soon as the OP sees the cost of a NORMAL u guage, he woukd back off.
 
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Jeez, Tony. I actually think you are serious! Anyway, as soon as the OP sees the cost of a NORMAL u guage, he woukd back off.

Deadly serious!

And deadly is what the OP might be if he buys the longer U-gauge ( because its in a flat ) and does it himself.

And as for telling him what kind of brushes to use for cleaning, that should be kept as a a trade secret and only discussed within the Combustion Chamber part of this site for registered gassers.
 
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Gotta be a late April Fool?................. :D :D

Its just another banned member trying to get a rise. At least Ben see's the funny side. I'd start worrying if you CC members find him / her posting in there. Mind you, I know a few qualified bods who would ask them sorts of questions - and they are let loose on the publics Gas Applainces everyday. Customers are happy though - as their generally that little bit cheaper as they are recently divorced or still living with Mummy and Daddy (oh ok then, Mummy OR Daddy).

Mr. W.
 
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Isn't it amusing that this little tw*t posts and then disappears leaving all to waste time arguing amongst ourselves. :(
 
J

Job123

You should not use just any old brush. In order to avoid damaging the expensive burner, most of use "artist's" brushes made of RED sable hair. Do not use the light colour variety; it is not stiff enough to remove dirt adequately. NEVER use synthetic brushes; synthetic "hair" is combustible and can create a fire hazard near open flames.
For measuring the burner pressure, you need what is called a u-gauge. As you are in a flat, you will need the bigger model, not the standard 300mm version.
Thanks for the warning against using brushes synthetic bristles.
Found some RED sable hair brushes but they are around £20 for a useful size of 3/4" or 1". Not worth the money considering that I will be using it once only.
Saw copper wire brushes at a couple of heating supplier's websites.
Any commends on using one of these to clean main burner assembly and heat exchanger?

I also want to flush the system, fill with an inhibitor and add an additive to prevent/stop leaks. What are the best products for these?

Also, any suggestions on using an inexpensive pump driven by an electric drill to drain the system?

Many thanks!

PS.
I am not a gas engineer but am a qualified engineer having served a 5-year apprenticeship at Rolls-Royce (Bristol) Ltd and have worked as an R&D engineer with Ford Motor Company and others.
The DIY project I am most proud of is building and flying a single seat aircraft powered by a heavily modded VW Beetle engine.
 

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