Growing Vegetables

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All,

I have a fairly rectangular garden lawn with three side beds filled with some hedge and trees. I'm thinking of planting vegetables in between the hedge plants/trees. I have access to some wood to make box scructure.

What is the recommended approach? Grow directly on soil or create a raised bed and fill with soil/compost etc? Looking to start preparation so it is ready for next season.

Thanks in advance for all valuable inputs.
 
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If you look at Monty Don on TV he has moved to raised beds, Personally I plant direct into soil, Give it a good dig over before the winter.
Make a plan of what you want to plant and go from there.
 
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Speaking to some of the oldies over the allotment, raised beds are favoured by those that find it difficult to bend down to weed etc.
 
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If have a chance some horse muck dug in the winter will assist growing next year.
 

JBR

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Marge is a very good gardener, though I say so myself, and she swears by 'no dig gardening'.
It's true, she grows all sorts very successfully, including some corn plants which are now 8 feet high.

Sorry. That's it. I have no idea what it means, but I know a man who does:
https://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/no-dig-method
 
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What are you planning to grow?

I grew veg for a few years. I used raised beds make from scaffold boards and filled with compost. Clay soil can compact down too much. You need to dig up around 1-2 feet of soil. Certain crops need the soil to be free of stones etc so carrots for example will fork if there’s too much obstacle in the way.

Pest control is an issue. I bought a vegetable netting kit to stop birds and flying insects from reaching the veg. Slugs are a whole different problem. They devastated my lettuce, radishes, celery and spinach.

Potatoes and carrots grew best in buckets. Tomatoes and chillies had their own planter pots.
 
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JP_

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I've been growing a few things since last year. Got a low raised bed (12cm floorboard height) which I filled with new compost and topsoil.
Lots of pots, but been told that too many and need to scale back.
Last year I had toms scattered around the garden in spaces and this worked better than pots - lost most plants to blight this year, so it pays to spread out tomatoes and keep them well trimmed.

Best produce in the ground probably tomatoes (much more fruit than pots), courgettes, spinach. Got chillies in pots in the greenhouse, and loads of gherkins, but getting bored of those now!

I might actually try potatoes next year, along with spinach and lettuce, tomatoes. And grow herbs - I bought the seeds, didn't get around the planting.
 
C

Captain Nemesis

Slugs are a whole different problem. They devastated my lettuce, radishes, celery and spinach.
1


Raised beds on legs are good, as you can put a few wraps of copper tape around the legs to stop slugs & snails climbing up.
 

JP_

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I have a resident frog. I think he must be doing a good job.
Caterpillars have destroyed more than slugs though.
 
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Even netting my sweetcorn this year didn’t protect them from those pesky squirrels!

04B8D667-D308-4BDA-BD03-3C9E54C65121.jpeg 6D46BF30-2972-44C4-A732-2B1791EF4301.jpeg
 
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What are you planning to grow?

I grew veg for a few years. I used raised beds make from scaffold boards and filled with compost. Clay soil can compact down too much. You need to dig up around 1-2 feet of soil. Certain crops need the soil to be free of stones etc so carrots for example will fork if there’s too much obstacle in the way.

Pest control is an issue. I bought a vegetable netting kit to stop birds and flying insects from reaching the veg. Slugs are a whole different problem. They devastated my lettuce, radishes, celery and spinach.

Potatoes and carrots grew best in buckets. Tomatoes and chillies had their own planter pots.

Until now I have only grown tomatoes and herbs in pots. So this will be a gradual growth.

I'm planning to start with Potatoes, tomatoes, beans, chillies etc. I want to take it slow and not get bogged down with so many to manage. Especially the pest problems which is listed here. I hear similar problems with Friends who are into growing vegetables.
 
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If have a chance some horse muck dug in the winter will assist growing next year.

i formerly used a lot. no need to dig it in, the worms do that for you. I habitually laid it 6" deep. it smothers most weeds. You can pull it back to plant through it, or lay it but not (at first) in contact with the stems. It will settle flattish but by then will have dried and weathered. By the following spring it will all have disappeared and you can lay some more.

the wood-shaving bedding is cleaner to handle and does not stink. It is high in carbon but saturated in nitrogenous urine so reasonably balanced. Straw bedding can be very objectionable. you need to water well before applying it, as it will absorb light rain. The surface dries out so that most weeds will not germinate.

Old gardening books will be referring to straw based bedding which is not the same.

You will gain plenty of baler twine which is handy in the garden.
 

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