Having an electric oven installed, has switch on wall behind

Joined
1 Dec 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
We have an oven with old setup where the switch is on the wall behind the hob. I believe this is no longer allowed. We need a new oven. What are the options for the installation? If I get the shop delivering to install, will they refuse? Will an electrician?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
31 May 2016
Messages
8,217
Reaction score
978
Country
United Kingdom
Is the switch more than 300mm from the hot surface? You can have the isolator in the cupboard adjacent if you want.
 
Joined
1 Dec 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Just checked and, no, the bottom of it is just 110mm above the hob.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
1 Dec 2020
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Okay, thanks for replies. Just wondering if I have to get the switch moved or removed before I can get a new one installed? Or rather, before anyone will agree to install it.
 
Joined
11 Jan 2012
Messages
4,912
Reaction score
805
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
You dont actually need a switch
Really?
I though it was a must.
So on a new kitchen, can we get rid of all those isolating switches?
Although, I know they can be in a cabinet now, so out of sight and making tiling a lot easier.
 
Joined
27 Jul 2007
Messages
997
Reaction score
168
Location
Norfolk
Country
United Kingdom
would it be possible to reroute the cable that supplies power to the switch and take it straight to the oven? then the old cable from switch to oven could be removed and the switch position tiled etc or if too much hassle just leave it where it is as it now now longer does anything. depending on the size of the switch a blanking plate could cover the old position
 
Joined
28 Jul 2006
Messages
21,283
Reaction score
2,306
Location
Oxfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Really?
I though it was a must.
So on a new kitchen, can we get rid of all those isolating switches?
Although, I know they can be in a cabinet now, so out of sight and making tiling a lot easier.
There is no regulation whatsoever that states that an isolation switch is needed for any kitchen appliance.
If you need to turn the power off for some reason you could just flip the MCB in the consumer unit off.
 
Joined
11 Jan 2012
Messages
4,912
Reaction score
805
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
There is no regulation whatsoever that states that an isolation switch is needed for any kitchen appliance.
If you need to turn the power off for some reason you could just flip the MCB in the consumer unit off.
Thanks, I didn't know.
So all the isolating switches are only there for convenience.
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
27,022
Reaction score
2,919
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
So all the isolating switches are only there for convenience.

Yes, for the convenience of being able to fully isolate a faulty appliance in order that the RCD that is being tripped by that faulty appliance can be reset and thus restore power to the circuit

Or maybe you consider getting tools and disconnecting cables from junction boxes is not a significant inconvenience.
 
Joined
11 Jan 2010
Messages
8,087
Reaction score
676
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Yes, for the convenience of being able to fully isolate a faulty appliance in order that the RCD that is being tripped by that faulty appliance can be reset and thus restore power to the circuit

Or maybe you consider getting tools and disconnecting cables from junction boxes is not a significant inconvenience.
The best way to fully isolate an appliance is to pull the plug. For a cooker (the only appliance that needs to be hardwired) flip it’s MCB.
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
27,022
Reaction score
2,919
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
The best way to fully isolate an appliance is to pull the plug. For a cooker (the only appliance that needs to be hardwired) flip it’s MCB.
(1) It may be difficult and/or time consuming to remove a plug from the socket if that socket is behind the appliance and the appliance is heavy.

(2) Most MCBs when tripped disconnect only the Live, they do not disconnect the Neutral

Leaving the Neutral connected means that if the appliance has a Neutral to Earth fault then the RCD will continue to trip when there is a load on other circuits protected by that RCD

rcd trip 2022.jpg
 
Joined
11 Jan 2010
Messages
8,087
Reaction score
676
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
1. If the appliance is faulty it needs moving anyway.
2. True. Cookers (the only appliance that needs hard wiring) usually have element leaks not neutral earth shorts.
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
27,022
Reaction score
2,919
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
1. If the appliance is faulty it needs moving anyway.
It will need moving at some time but the urgency would be to restore power to the affected circuits by a reset of the RCD.
2. True. Cookers (the only appliance that needs hard wiring) usually have element leaks not neutral earth shorts.
Element leaks ? Leaks from where to where ? Are these "element leaks" you refer to just leakage from Live to Neutral without any involvement of the metallic sheath of the elements affected.

Please think before you type
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top