Height of kitchen worktop

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I'm doing up the kitchen in a house that I will be renting out in the future. There are some solid, hand built units which are freestanding, only the sink unit is to any extent fixed.

The unit to the left of the cooker will be moved to another wall, and I want to replace it with fixed worktop with appliances under.

The problem is that the worktop existing around the sink is only c. 20mm thick (solid pine), and the level comes to underneath the top edge of the standard height cooker.

If I install new standard 40mm worktop to the left, and raise it so that the top edge is level with the top of the cooker, there should be clearance under for appliances. But it will look very odd.

If I keep it in line with existing worktop, then the underside will likely take up too much of the underside height and appliances will not fit.

I don't particularly want to mess about any more with the sink unit, especially now that the new boiler has much pipework running through holes in the wood of the worktop. And it would be problematic with the underfitted Belfast sink...

Please note that the photo is an old one, but the fundamentals are still the same more or less.

Any suggestions? Many thanks.
 

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Just fit it to allow appliance under , if it's a rental why worry what if looks like. You could fit 26mm hardwood top which will allow you the room and look similar.
 
D

Doggit

Although it's a rental property, and the existing worktops are still good, you may be better off replacing all the worktops with cheap 28mm ones, and keep everything the same. And if I've misread the post, and it's the units you're worried about, then you'd be better off putting all the build under appliences together on one wall.
 
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Just fit it to allow appliance under , if it's a rental why worry what if looks like. You could fit 26mm hardwood top which will allow you the room and look similar.

Apparently renters are a bit more discerning these days than I am myself unfortunately! And the better it is in terms of finish, the higher you can charge (within what's reasonable for the market of course).

I did consider another piece of hardwood worktop of a similar light colour but it's generally pricey, and the budget is as low as possible...
:unsure:
 
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Although it's a rental property, and the existing worktops are still good, you may be better off replacing all the worktops with cheap 28mm ones, and keep everything the same. And if I've misread the post, and it's the units you're worried about, then you'd be better off putting all the build under appliences together on one wall.

Due to removal of the worktop over the sink now being tricky because of nine pipes going through it to and from the boiler, I'd rather avoid replacement of the existing if possible. And I'm not sure if you can fit cheap (presumably laminate) worktop around a Belfast sink due to the issues of splashed moisture.
 
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Doggit

As long as everything is sealed to death, then it should be fine, but yes, it's a risk.
 
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Apparently renters are a bit more discerning these days than I am myself unfortunately! And the better it is in terms of finish, the higher you can charge (within what's reasonable for the market of course).

I did consider another piece of hardwood worktop of a similar light colour but it's generally pricey, and the budget is as low as possible...
:unsure:
Bit of a contradiction , you want a cheap worktop but quality look?
 
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As long as everything is sealed to death, then it should be fine, but yes, it's a risk.

I can't comprehend any method of sealing, finishing and proofing the raw chipboard edge that would ever last for very long in this situation before it started to deteriorate.
 
D

Doggit

I paste silicone sealant into the raw edge (white of course). But I didn't say it was perfect. Or you could go for allunimium angle bead as well.
 

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