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HELP!!! Brown fluid under the boiler...need re-assurance!

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by DannyFlash, 7 Jul 2004.

  1. DannyFlash

    DannyFlash

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    Hi there I hope there is someone out there that can help me!! :oops:

    As you can see from the subject above I have a slight problem, this has happened before a few months ago but the boiler has now given up the ghost, and just screams at me when it trys to get going!

    The boiler is only just over 12months old and is a Worcester Heatslave 15/19

    I have figured out that there is no pressure in the system as the pressure dial has flumped back onto the resting pin, and i think the screaming noise is the pump for the central heating, now what i need to know is... how easy is it to re-pressurize the system, is it something that a DIY dabbler can do or just leave it to the pro's and pay em a fortune for doing it?? And where has this leak came from?? is there a "blow off" valve, or could it have a burst??

    Please guide me!! :confused:
     
  2. croydoncorgi

    croydoncorgi

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    DON'T run the pump with the boiler empty!!! It's water lubricated and will self-destruct.

    There should be a 'filling loop' (silver-coloured flexible tube) either connected between a cold water supply pipe and the main heating return pipe (28mm?) near the boiler, or lying around ready to make such a connection. (According to Water Bylelaws, the loop should be removed when not in use.)

    At either or both ends of the loop there will be a valve assembly with a quarter turn tap (like a washing machine connector). With the loop connected open one of the taps fully and then the other slightly. Mains water will flow into the plumbing and to the boiler and the indicated pressure on the gauge should rise. When it reaches 1 Bar or so, CLOSE (BOTH) VALVE(s).

    If the system loses pressure completely in less than a couple of months, there's a significant leak that needs to be fixed. If you have to keep re-pressurising the boiler, very soon there will be no corrosion inhibitor left in the water, quite apart from any damage the leak may cause.
     
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  4. DannyFlash

    DannyFlash

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    Many thanks for that!! hopefully the pump shouldn't be that bad, as i switched it off @ the mains when i realised where the noise was coming from! (thought it was on the telly to start with!!) so i shouldn't have to dig that deep in my pockets!!

    I presume this sort of thing just happens, or could I point the big long finger of blame to the installer for not doing it properly in the first place?

    Thanks again!

    Dan
     
  5. oilman

    oilman

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    When exactly does the boiler make a noise?
    Does it do it immediately the boiler tries to fire? If it makes a noise ONLY when the central heating starts, or when you open the hot tap, then it is the water pump. Otherwise it is the oil pump and this does not happen except if the pump is damaged. Damage can be caused by running dry, or by dirt or water getting in. Replacement is the only option for the oil pump.

    Contact Worcester Bosch or the guarantee will be invalidated.
     
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  7. croydoncorgi

    croydoncorgi

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    On most 'sealed' systems you can expect noticeable pressure loss over 4 to 6 months. Water finds it way out from places like gland seals on radiator valves but not enough to actually make anything wet.

    Just re-pressurise to about 1 Bar whenever.

    OTOH, if pressure loss is quicker, find the cause. Apart from anything else (damage to floor, ceilings, etc), each time you add more water, you're diluting the corrosion inhibitor that SHOULD be in the system. :(
     
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