House sale/electrics check

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by SJRSJR, 28 Aug 2014.

  1. plugwash

    plugwash

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    That is an installation certificate, it is intended to cover the installation work that was done.

    With the installation work being a new CU that means some basic testing of the final circuits connected to the CU is called for but it's still not the same as a proper inspection of the whole installation.
     
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  3. SJRSJR

    SJRSJR

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    Thanks very much, that's helpful, I won't get too bolshy about it!
     
  4. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Yes, it's an installation certificate, but I'm not sure what you mean by "some basic tests of the final circuits". As far as I can see, all final circuits have been tested as fully as one could/would for any inspection. They have also picked up the absence of earths on the lighting and cooker circuits - the latter of which seems to be a major concern (and I'm surprised it is classified as 'C3'). However, you are right in saying that it is not a "proper inspection of the full installation" - although most of the things missing really relate to aspects of visual inspection.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I thought you said that she had 'agreed to complete at the originally agreed price' - have you not yet exchanged contracts?

    I would personally think it's time for you to issue some more ultimatums/deadlines, specifying a date/time after which you will put the property back on the market (at the full original asking price) unless she has exchanged contracts with you by that date/time ... but I suppose it depends on how keen (or desparate!) you are not to lose the sale!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Perhaps they have a gas cooker, and the circuit is unused?
     
  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Perhaps they do, but if the circuit exists, it is not really acceptable for it not to have an earth - someone could connect a cooker to the circuit the day after the inspection!

    I have to say that I find it pretty extraordinary that they connected (and tested!) a cooker circuit without a CPC to the new CU. I'm also very suspicious about the testing - since, for example, they give a figures for "R1+R2" and Zs, in the apparent absence of a CPC (the CPC's CSA being recorded as "N/A")!! I don't even really understand what 'no earth/CPC' actually means - what cable can it possibly be wired with (just 6mm² L&N singles, but no CPC, perhaps?)?

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  9. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    deleted - wrong thread, apologies!
     
  10. SJRSJR

    SJRSJR

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    Thought I'd let you know of the eventual outcome of this. The buyer got her electrician friend round. I'd already pre-empted them by saying "Yes, I know it's never been re-wired, that's already reflected in the price, so we won't be dropping the price any further."

    Once that was done she wanted the central heating checking. The house has been empty for ages, but thankfully the 15 year old boiler fired up first time and got the thumbs up.

    Then she wanted the double glazing checking. Again, someone else round, tut tutting because one small vent had condensation and some silicon sealant had come away.

    Then there was the concern about whether the thickness of the free loft insulation installed by British Gas in 2012 was Building Regs compliant and how much it would cost to re-do.

    She did make one last ditch effort to get another £1000 off but by then I'd had enough so told her to take it or leave it. She took it, but even then dragged it out with the solicitors for a few more weeks.

    Now it's finally over, I half wish I had pulled out but that would have just cut off my nose to spite my face. I do have one guilty pleasure - when they do come to re-wire she probably hasn't given much thought to how long it will take to steam off the much over-painted woodchip wallpaper throughout. Good luck with that. :evil:
     
  11. skotl

    skotl

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    Glad to hear it all worked out in the end - thanks for updating us!

    As a resident of Scotland, where an offer to buy a house is binding, I'm just amazed that English (and Welsh?) law allows a seller to pull out at pretty much any time, and that this then leads to these kinds of games.

    Move to Scotland!
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I know relatively little about the process in Scotland, but I suspect that there is not quite as much difference from E&W as it might appear, other than a difference in vocabulary - in particular, a difference in meaning of "offer to buy" in the different places.

    In E&W, there is a point at which there is a binding agreement for the buyer to buy (and for the seller to sell), but this is called "Exchange of Contracts" - which is presumably essentially the same as 'making an offer to buy' in Scotland. However, I presume that, even in Scotland, there is often a period of possible inspections (and maybe potential negotiations?) prior to the (binding) offer to buy being made - and that would seem essentially equivalent to what goes on prior to Exchange of Contracts in E&W.

    As far as I can see, the main difference is that in E&W, an "offer" will often/usually have been made at the start of that 'period of possible inspections (and maybe potential negotiations?)' - but that is only an essentially 'informal' provisional offer ('subject to contract') and, as you imply, is in no way binding on the buyer (or seller). I would suspect that in Scotland, a potential buyer may well have 'expressed an interest in buying' prior to making their (binding offer) and, if so, that would be roughly equivalent to the "making an offer" in E&W.

    ... or have I totally misunderstood the Scottish system?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  13. cozycats

    cozycats

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    It took me near 3 weeks just for the hall in our house :D :D
     
  14. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Nitromors, some serious PPE and a stiff wire brush.
     
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