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How do I fix this leaking central heating drain point?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by nishnish, 21 Jan 2010.

  1. nishnish

    nishnish

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    Hi,
    My central heating drain point has been dodgy for a while, but now refuses to shutoff completely. Constantly dripping.
    Here it is:

    [​IMG]

    It seems to be threaded into the proceeding joint. Marked

    1
    -
    2

    P

    underneath.
    The proceeding joint is a soldered tee, with what looks like 2x22mm pipes (maybe imperial) and at the end the drain fitting you can see.
    What would I replace that with?
    Do I need an imperial fitting?
    Thanks in advance.[/img]
     
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  3. cross thread

    cross thread

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    TAKE IT APART AND REPLACE THE WASHER
     
  4. nishnish

    nishnish

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    Thanks for the quick reply.
    Would that be a standard washer?
    Do you happen to know the type from that pic?
    Is it possible to replace this with a 'better' valve?
    Don't really like those square head things. I can see plenty of damage on it from previous users.
    Cheers.
     
  5. Happyplumber

    Happyplumber

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    drain the system and just replace the who drain off be alot simpler for you then looking around for washer

    only couple quid to be buy
     
  6. HarrogateGas

    HarrogateGas

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    If your fairly confident and competent, then just unscrew the whole drain valve and change it for another or any other 1/2 threaded valve you choose. No need to drain, just be quick!! and put a towel underneath.
     
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  7. nishnish

    nishnish

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    What would I replace it with? I'm not sure whether that is imperial or not.
    Cheers.
     
  8. seco services

    seco services

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    it's a thread so it will be 1/2".
     
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  9. Happyplumber

    Happyplumber

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    • Thanks Thanks x 1
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  11. nishnish

    nishnish

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  12. dextrous

    dextrous

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    bit of ptfe (or loctite 55) round the thread will be required
     
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  13. Happyplumber

    Happyplumber

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    No worries,my pleasure :D :D

    Fill ya boots and good luck
     
  14. nishnish

    nishnish

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    It's clear now (thanks guys) that I need a 1/2" threaded fitting. After seeing Happyplumber's suggestion (which I'll get), I've also seen different types. My little knowledge is becoming dangerous.
    What's the difference between:

    Type A/B
    Light/Heavy Pattern
    Glanded

    I think that latter is a gland around the square bit which stops water squirting out of it, whilst opening it? As the current design did.
    But what are the others?
    Cheers.
     
  15. TicklyT

    TicklyT

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    IMO the light pattern may have it's uses, but very rarely will it be for domestic plumbing. The difference is the lack of any glanding, meaning, as you have found, a lot (maybe most?) of what comes out the valve passes up the thread, then up your sleeve when you open it.

    That may not be a problem in some industrial applications, where everything can drop straight into a sump for later disposal, but hopeless in a home , particularly one with light coloured carpets.

    For the price difference, 'Ship', 'Tar', 'Halfpenny' and 'Spoil' comes to mind.

    Yet some plumbers still fit the things!
     
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  16. nishnish

    nishnish

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    Ok. Thanks.
    So glanded heavy pattern is the one to go for. As Happyplumber so sagely pointed out.
    However, what's the difference between type A and B?
    Cheers.
     
  17. DIYnot Local

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