How to cut a double post-formed laminate breakfast bar

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by KH, 11 Feb 2010.

  1. KH

    KH

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    Wondered what the cleanest DIY method would be to trim a laminated breakfast bar down to size...
    It's double post-formed for an island, so no back edge so to speak. Any advice on tools to use which end to start the cut from - I need to get both edges of the cut clean?

    I'll also be finishing the cut edge with matching edging strip so any advice on best methods or contact adhesive to use?

    Thanks...
     
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  3. gorgeousgordy

    gorgeousgordy

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    Do you want to cut it to length or width
     
  4. KH

    KH

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    Cut it to correct length.
    Need to maintain the 900mm width for the overhang as breakfast bar.
     
  5. gorgeousgordy

    gorgeousgordy

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    I am presuming that the worktop hasnt been fitted yet.
    After cutting it a few mm oversize with a plunge saw I would clamp or screw a wide batten to the underneath of the worktop and using a top bearing guided cutter in my router I would cut from right hand side to the middle. Then turn the worktop the right way up and using a bottom bearing guided cutter again cut from the right hand side to past where you had previously cut.
    The important thing is that the cutter is cutting into the face of the worktop.
    To fix the edge strip you can either use edging tape contact adhesive or PVA
     
  6. Blagard

    Blagard

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    I like this idea of finishing the top with a router! You made me think about the cutting into the face - yeah its late and the grey matter didn't switch in until a few moments thought! That is to avoid the cutter ripping the edge away from the worktop as you move it in one direction. You already know which way the cutter spins so you move from right to left, never left to right. - Must remember that on the next edge job I use mine on! Also new to me was the top bearing cutter! Only ever seen the bottom bearing sort.
     
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  8. gorgeousgordy

    gorgeousgordy

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    I've just realised I wrote a bit wrong, you feed the router from the left to the right not from the right to the left because the cutter is spinning clockwise.
     
  9. Blagard

    Blagard

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    So in reality you use a Router as often as me! (I jest!) I had learnt very early on that despite the speed of the cutter it does make a difference to the direction you move it. I had not given any left to right consideration as a general rule becuse it does not work when you are working on a mortice type of cutting and have the router move in all four directions!

    People that use equipment on a very regular basis will have trained themselves to do the right thing without really giving it special thought as the right thing becomes second nature. A bit like which way you move the indicator switch in your car!

    PS I think I will leave it until I get my router out again to try the top bearing cutter that I have coming! - Now that is still very useful to know about.
     
  10. chippie244

    chippie244

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    You move the router in a different direction depending on whether your going on the inside or outside of a template but until it is in my hands I can't say which is which.
    If the router is pulling you, you're going in the wrong direction.
    I tend to leave the speed on full.
    As you say it becomes natural but I haven't used a router daily for a few years, not since I bought a TS55.
     
  11. chippie244

    chippie244

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    Being technical it's called gyroscopic progression,.
     
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