1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

How to deal with the floor.

Discussion in 'Tiling' started by cdbe, 14 Oct 2021.

  1. cdbe

    cdbe

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    1,387
    Thanks Received:
    244
    Location:
    Oldham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm fitting a new bathroom (in what was previously part of a bedroom, with the remainder partitioned off to form a corridor to a new extension).

    It's a 1930's, first floor, the joists are under spanned and the t&g boards are 3/4" - all appears to be pretty solid.

    The floor will be tiled , probably in something large format.

    I'm struggling to understand the process for the floor. I don't want to remove the existing boards, so as a starting point, should I do anything with them? - as a minimum check all are in good condition and securely nailed?

    Assuming that's acceptable, what should I do next - the footprint means that a single sheet of 12mm (max, due to height issues) wbp ply would cover most of the trafficked area (less a 300mm strip on the back wall below the sink unit and wall hung WC) - if I did this (screwed through to joists at 150mm centre's) would I also need to glue it in some way?

    I guess the alternative is these cement boards (I have previously used 6mm solid vertically to form a stud wall shower enclosure and I could sort of see the point of these vs plasterboard). I just don't see how they work on a floor - I keep reading that you have to glue and screw them down, is this with some kind of no-nails or do you bed them on an adhesive like tiles? And how do they help? Surely the fact that there's joints every 600/1200mm means movement and cracked tiles, I know people say they're waterproof but unless part of a fully tanked system the water will find it's way out anyway ? I'm happy to be pursuaded otherwise if they are a better option!

    Thanks.

    IMG_20211014_092232070.jpg
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. opps

    opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    5,173
    Thanks Received:
    817
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Are you not planning to use a decoupling mat as well?

    Personally, I would rip the existing floor up and start from scratch. An advantage is that you will see where pipes and cables run. Additionally, once you add the decoupling matts you won't have problems with the overall height.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. cdbe

    cdbe

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    1,387
    Thanks Received:
    244
    Location:
    Oldham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Never heard of them - until now! I'm not ripping up another floor and the pipework is sorted - but it sounds like some of that directly on the timber would be the solution.
     
Loading...

Share This Page