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How to turn on a wall socket from an infra-red beam?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by howardino, 1 Jul 2013.

  1. howardino

    howardino

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    Yes, that would equally well. Is this something I could wire up myself?
    So when you say unswitched socket - are you talking about a wall socket with the manual switch removed and can still plug in any appliance into it - or what I think you guys call a fused spur - where the appliance would be hard wired. I would prefer the former as its an lcd monitor I'm looking to turn on.

    Could I take a spur from an existing wall socket to create a new socket and have that controlled by the separate relay you mention above. In that way, I can plug in any lcd monitor. I'm new to all this relay wizardry, so apologies if I'm talking rubbish.

    What is the name of the type of relay that you mention that would control the socket, so I can google it and can get some product info.

    @EFLImpudence - What I'm trying to achieve is, that when someone steps foot onto my drive, the IR beam is broken, the relay turns on the mains socket, which turns on the connected lcd monitor, which is showing cctv. That way family members can quickly see who is approaching the property. Ideally, the monitor goes off after a preset time, so a relay with a built-in timer?

    thx.
     
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Confusing

    Up to 50V AC is extra-low voltage
    >50V to 1,000V AC is low voltage.
     
  4. Mursal

    Mursal

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    "but you will have high voltage down where you put the beam"
    Apologies I should have said, voltage high enough to be dangerous

    "(12V @ 0.5A) on the beam, but its all low voltage work."
    Voltage that can be worked on by DIY people without the risk of getting electrocuted

    It was never my intention to confuse, sorry about that ...........
     
  5. seasickstevie

    seasickstevie

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    Apart from all the IR / Relay stuff, have you checked that when the monitor is simply powered up (by the socket) that the screen will display CCTV?

    If it's a dedicated monitor maybe it will, but if you're using a TV, they usually stay in standby.
     
  6. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    As with all electrical work, that depends upon your knowledge, competence and ability to test your work to ensure that it is safe. Based on the sort of questions you are asking, and your admitted lack of knowledge of some of the things being discussed (like relays), it sounds as if it may well be a case in which you ought to get an electrician to do it for you.
    Not 'removed' - just never there in the first place - like this click here.
    Yes, that's the sort of thing we're talking about (provided that the existing socket is not already an unfused spur from a ring circuit - in which case one is not allowed to spur from it - an electrician could check that). The relay would be wired in 'between' the existing socket and the new one.
    There are countless available. Most are just 'bare', so you would also need to provide an appropriate enclosure ('box') for it.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  7. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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  8. howardino

    howardino

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    Funny you should mention that! Not only is their the problem of going into standby when powered up, there is also how long a tv/monitor takes to actually display a picture. The problem is that these 2 items are not usually listed on the spec sheet so internet research is about as useful as a chocolate teapot. So I had to do things the old fashioned way. Went down to currys and trying to look as normal as possible:cool:, switch tv's/monitors off and on and take some notes! :mrgreen: Looking around occasionally, to see if I'm getting any funny looks saying that bloke's a nutter! :) Most tv's take around 8seconds to turn on. I did find a couple of monitors that take around 3 seconds to turn on. These are pc monitors, they do go into standby if there is no video signal.
     
  9. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    They generally do - but I think this is usually a function that one can 'turn off'. However, in the situation you've been describing, wouldn't a video signal already be present when they were powered up, anyway?

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    What will happen when you are all asleep?

    Or out/away?
     
  12. howardino

    howardino

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  13. howardino

    howardino

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    At the moment, I have a external pir sensor, with a rf socket and chime bell.
    So when we are sleeping, the chime bell alerts us to any activity, and I can quickly check the monitor if there is anything untoward.

    I'm trying to replicate this using beams, as the pir sensor covers the property itself and doesn't have enough range to the bottom of the drive. If I put another sensor at the bottom, I'm going to boundary overspill - the front of our property is completely open.

    If we are out, it doesn't matter, the bell rings, the monitor comes on for 30secs and goes off. No big deal. If you wondering whether I get alerted to a visitor to the property, yes the dvr sends me an email alert.
     
  14. howardino

    howardino

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    sorry buddy, think I missed your post. I've often wondered if remotes could be hacked and some sort of relay switch put in. It does sound good, as there are quite a few sockets with rf remotes, but just not sure what sort of hack/parts would be required. Plus would also need some sort of timer to turn it off again.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    That's what I was also implying.
    I very much doubt it, but that would depend on the specification of the IR beam device. I suspect that most are only designed to produce a low current 'signal' output to interface with an alarm system.
    Again, that would depend upon the design of the beam device. If it only produces an output whilst the beam(s) are interrupted then, yes, you would need some sort of 'timer' to keep your monitor on beyond that. However, it's far from impossible that some of yhese devices have built in functionality which maintains the output for a period beyond that of beam interruption.
    It's certainly getting more complicated. Again, it could well be that you would be best off finding someone experienced in such matters - it's very possible that there are 'standard solutions' (and products) available for the sort of functionality you want, and an understanding of the spec and behaviour of the beam device would certainly be central to any designing.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Couldn't you simply point a PIR away from the boundary, so that it would only detect movement on your side of the boundary?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  17. howardino

    howardino

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    The problem with that is, it would leave open an area where someone could sneak up the side and put a bag or something over the pir.
     
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