How to use centering holes on die handle

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by toolcub, 28 Dec 2010.

  1. toolcub

    toolcub

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    Having never worked with a die handle before, I would like to know how to use the centering fingers on a die handle. Also I was able to use the handle without the fingers ok, but wonder if the threads would be better with them. I am cutting a 2-56 thread on a 1/8th in rod. I started the die on the thread, then just turned the handle til I got the thread length I wanted. Since the rod is so small, I didn't think I needed oil, or to turn on, then back it off a little, then turn on again, then back it off a little. Can someone give me some "die" advise?

    Thanks
     
  2. Hitachimad

    Hitachimad

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    Regardless of size, you need to use oil, and ideally back off, otherwise there may be a good chance it will tear, more than it cuts, especially if its poor quality bar, and a cheapy die.
     
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  4. TicklyT

    TicklyT

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    Unless you are cutting brass, lubrication is essential. Without it, swarf tends to cold weld to the cutting edges and destroy the thread you are cutting, or wear and chip the die.

    In the absence of a purpose made cutting lube, lard (yes, rendered down bacon fat) works well. It was the best cutting lube available for the job before modern petrochemicals evolved.

    'Backing off' the die by 1/4 turn breaks the cut swarf into chips that should fall clear instead of choking the die.

    The three screws in the diestock allow fine adjustment of the finished thread diameter. Brand new split dies usually cut a little on the small side of their nominal size, and need a tweak on the centre retaining screw of the diestock to spring them out to their nominal size.

    Alignment collars, fingers etc. on the diestock are normally only much use starting the thread square on the work. once the thread is started, they just get in the way.

    If the die doesn't start square, you can end up with a drunken thread, usually undersized, and weaving about on the workpiece. Cutting a drunken thread overloads the die, as one side is digging deeper into the work than it should.
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Over here there is a cutting compound called Trefolex which works well - its like a grease that quickly liquifies with heat friction. Smells nice too - just a dab behind the ears, etc.
    With an 1/8" dia thread I reckon it will start to bend no matter how careful you are if the thread is to be any length. Make sure your die is an HSS type and not carbon steel - and if its a split one its possible to open it a fraction so the full depth of the thread isn't cut at once.
    Do your DIY shops stock ready threaded rod which you could use instead?
    John :)
     
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  7. Jasonb

    Jasonb

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    Tricky I think you will find it was Tallow not Lard that was used as a cutting fluid. Bacon fat is better suited to metal spinning

    One other thing that will help start teh thread is to file a chamfer onto the end of whatever you are threading as this helps the die to start cutting.

    Also make sure the side of the die with the writing on it faces the work as they have a lead taper ground into them.

    Jason
     
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