Indoor CCTV for parent with dementia

Joined
12 Jul 2008
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
Hi.

My father recently passed away leaving my mother who suffers with dementia and Alzheimers. I want to install indoor cameras to allow my brother and I to check on her whilst at work etc. Ideally, we would like something as follows:
Max. 10 cameras
Ideally battery operated
Currently no WiFi in-situ but can get if required
Two way coms
Remote viewing via phone
Ability to move pan/tilt would be useful

Thank you in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
24 Sep 2016
Messages
1,043
Reaction score
165
Country
United Kingdom
Avoid battery operated unless you want to be round there every other day changing batteries, it would be fine if the cameras were record on movement for instance but remote controllable, pan/tilt and 2 way audio you won’t get much life out of them.

You say no WiFi in situ is that no broadband at all? Unless you have broadband there then it’s record only. No remote view, pan tilt etc.
 
Joined
12 Jul 2008
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
Thank you for your advice. No internet at all, but I can get that installed if needed.

I'll skip the battery and go for mains powered.

Any recommendations, please?

Thanks again.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,937
Reaction score
2,901
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Avoid wireless as evesdropping on images can and frequently does happen. Your mother's privacy is essential.
 
Joined
30 Dec 2018
Messages
11,578
Reaction score
1,624
Country
United Kingdom
Avoid wireless as evesdropping on images can and frequently does happen. Your mother's privacy is essential.

I agree, besides the wifi might be overwhelmed with multiple cameras struggling for access, use cameras as above, but ensure they have wired LAN ability. Your router will either need enough ports (default is for) or an extra router will be needed for more than four.
 
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
650
Reaction score
101
Location
Nottinghamshire
Country
United Kingdom
I fully understand why you wish to do this BUT.....

My late aunt insisted in remaining in her own home for as long as possible. In the later months she too suffered from dementia and would sometimes leave thing son or go out of the house. She had visits from paid carers three times a day.

The local authority provided her care (via an agency) and was over-seen by adult social services. I did mention the idea of the installing cameras in her house (she lived several miles away) but social services strongly advised me not to, even though I was her legal guardian. The reasons they gave included:

a). Can the person give consent to you seeing their activities?
b). You must NOT be able to capture any images of the person in an undressed or semi naked state
c). If Carers attend the house, then the house becomes a "place of work" for the Carers so you have legal obligations there.

I guess what I'm saying is please look into this very carefully. You may well think that you are doing your best to look after your parents in the later years but equally you could find yourself in alot of trouble for "invading privacy" and potentially voyeurism! (Yes, I thought that was OTT to.... but I had a word with a friendly Solicitor and his advice was also don't do it).
 
Joined
30 Dec 2018
Messages
11,578
Reaction score
1,624
Country
United Kingdom
A bit vague on this, but I read/saw/heard something about some monitoring system which sounded quite clever at keeping an automatic 'eye' on elderly people, by monitoring there activity switching things on and off, boiling kettles etc., got an idea of their usual routine and triggered an alarm if anything out of the ordinary happened, or there was a lack of normal activity.
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,937
Reaction score
2,901
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
There are clever ways to monitor the wellbeing of a person. Flow sensors on the incoming water main, doors being opened and closed etc, if nor activity for a few hours then alert is raised. Most people will defend their indepence and object to being monitored. Increasing their safety by fitting a "burglar alarm" can be the cover story for installing the sensors for detecting lack of activity.

The more important and much harder decision is deciding whether the person is safe to be left in "independent" living.
 
Joined
12 Jul 2008
Messages
66
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
Thank you all for your advice. Plenty to think about but this has helped a great deal.

Thanks once more. I'll let you know how we get on.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top