Internal wall corner crack- Victorian terraced house.

S

Spinozus

Hello.

Victorian terraced house moved at the back causing these cracks.

This crack is located on the second floor. It stretched vertically from the floor up to the ceiling and horizontally from the top of of the corner in the direction of ceiling lines. Vertical crack is about 1cm wide and it shows on both sides of the wall which separates the landing and a bedroom. I looked inside of the crack and I've seen that this wall was build from bricks, wood studs and covered from both sides with mud-like plaster.

Could you please let me know what is the best way to fix this crack?

Thank you for your time.
 
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Aren't the insurers going to repair it?

You'll need to know the actual cause before you can implement a suitable repair
 
S

Spinozus

Aren't the insurers going to repair it?

You'll need to know the actual cause before you can implement a suitable repair

Thank you very much for your response.

Structural engineers company was monitoring this crack for 12 months and since there were no movement they concluded that it wasn't caused by subsidence. They informed us that this crack was a result of house movement which is quite typical in Victorian terraced houses located on the slightly sloping site and this doesn't fall under repair.

At the same time they were monitoring cracks at the front of the house and they noticed substantial opening of the cracks which was followed by foundation repairs and they also repaired cracks.
 
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From what you have said, I would be complaining to the insurer as it would seem that the movement is all related. Take it to the ombudsman if need be

That amount of movement is not normal and should normally be covered by a home policy

Repair wise, there may be options to fix some right-angled brackets to the surface and then replaster, or it may be more extensive rebuilding/rebonding of the two walls. Resin crack stitching may work, but this would not be a normal repair for this method
 
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S

Spinozus

From what you have said, I would be complaining to the insurer as it would seem that the movement is all related. Take it to the ombudsman if need be

That amount of movement is not normal and should normally be covered by a home policy

Repair wise, there may be options to fix some right-angled brackets to the surface and then replaster, or it may be more extensive rebuilding/rebonding of the two walls. Resin crack stitching may work, but this would not be a normal repair for this method

Thank you very much Woody for your detailed response.

We are going to contact insurer one more time and if they wouldn't resolve this issue we will complain.

Happy New Year!!!! :)
 
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We live in a Victorian house. We have several large cracks which have been there for at least 30 years (we moved in in 1982). They haven't changed. The best fix for ours IMO is to fill in with lime plaster, as was the original build.
 

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