Isolator switch located directly below shower pump

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by raine, 8 Sep 2021.

Tags:
  1. raine

    raine

    Joined:
    21 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi,

    See pic here and attached. Is it allowed to have the isolator switch located directly below the shower pump?

    (Ignore the fact that the switch faceplate is off - I've opened it up to let it dry out after the pump leaked!) :eek:

    I've been researching BS 7671, and it seems that the defined bathroom zones only apply to shower heads and water outlets, and there appears to be no restrictions around the proximity and positioning of electrics to shower pumps. Is this correct??

    So, I think this could be classed as rather stupid and dangerous, but not actually in contravention of any regs, right?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sponsored Links
  3. yorkspark

    yorkspark

    Joined:
    6 Mar 2011
    Messages:
    191
    Thanks Received:
    35
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Absolutely nothing wrong with that, not stupid or dangerous, is the circuit rcd/rcbo protected? It's only the same as an immersion heater or electric shower, and would be more concerned about the quality of the pump/plumbing if it keeps leaking
     
  4. jj4091

    jj4091

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    5,182
    Thanks Received:
    487
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Chicken & egg. o_O
     
  5. plugwash

    plugwash

    Joined:
    28 Mar 2004
    Messages:
    9,629
    Thanks Received:
    382
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    BS7671 gives prescriptive rules for a number of locations that are judged to be unusually high risk. Bathrooms being the most common one.

    Mostly though it's left to the judgement of the installer to decide whether equipment is suitable for the environment it is being used in and for better or worse we normally only take account of normal conditions in a location, not of things getting wet due to non-electrical failures.
     
  6. raine

    raine

    Joined:
    21 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ok, understood that it doesn't contravene the regs, thanks.

    I still maintain that it is a stupid and dangerous location for the switch though, directly in the path of gravity should a leak occur, particularly as there is plenty of space to the side of the adjacent noggin. Why take the risk?

    In this particular scenario, the push-fit connector on the outlet pipe at the top worked loose, and a good deal of water reached the inside of the switch. RCD or not, in my mind, that's dangerous.
     
  7. winston1

    winston1

    Joined:
    11 Jan 2010
    Messages:
    7,310
    Thanks Received:
    565
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Push fit connectors don't work loose. If it was loose it is because the plumber did not fit it properly.
     
  8. Sponsored Links
  9. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

    Joined:
    28 Jul 2006
    Messages:
    20,618
    Thanks Received:
    2,140
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Take a look in the average ceiling void. Here we have a whole lot of electrical bits and pieces, junction boxes, etc. In at least one place in the ceiling there is a lighting pendant with all of its electrical connections.
    The ceiling is supported by rows of wooden joists. Also in the ceiling void are sundry plumbers pipes carrying water through the space.
    Some of these pipes are under mains pressure.

    In the event of a leak, heres whats happens:

    The water runs into the nearest space between two joists and the space can fill up with water. The water will find its way out, often through the light pendant, shorting out the lighting circuit. Before it does that it will saturate any electrical junctions that are sitting on near or the plasterboard.
    Luckily, ceilings have a built in fail safe mechanism. When they get wet, they collapse allowing the water to dispense through any open door.

    How many risks can you see now? Should building regulations not permit water and electricity together anywhere?

    No, us electricians are trusting souls and believe that our friends, the plumbers, will use adequate materials and workmanship to prevent water and lekky meeting.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. sparkwright

    sparkwright

    Joined:
    20 Aug 2009
    Messages:
    8,949
    Thanks Received:
    1,128
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Exactly as Taylor says.

    The point is, you can have a leak anywhere and no one can predict where the water is going to end up.

    Some leaks don't even go straight down - you could have a fine spray, spraying in an almost horizontal direction.

    Roofs leak, people do stupid things with buckets of water when cleaning, or even washing their hands - you can't predict it.

    For what's it's worth, I would often try to fit an electrical item over pipework fittings rather than under - but not if it makes things awkward - this job is difficult enough as it is.
     
  11. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

    Joined:
    7 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    37,780
    Thanks Received:
    4,246
    Location:
    Retired to:
    Country:
    Portugal
    Also, Raine, what do you think will happen if the switch gets wet?
     
  12. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

    Joined:
    28 Jul 2006
    Messages:
    20,618
    Thanks Received:
    2,140
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    And it is always the plumber's fault
    DJwhHUsVwAA1QDu.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. chivers67

    chivers67

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2008
    Messages:
    1,454
    Thanks Received:
    178
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That pic's mental! TTC!
     
  14. mattylad

    mattylad

    Joined:
    27 Apr 2008
    Messages:
    8,415
    Thanks Received:
    646
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The plumber was mental :)
     
Loading...

Share This Page