Kitchen cabinets resting on tiles

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Thanks for any help on this.

We've moved into a house which has a relatively new fitted kitchen. It is a Homebase Como, if that means anything to anyone. I don't have receipts or warranties and I don't know if Homebase's fitters even fitted it.

The end wall-unit was really sagging down once stuff was in the units.

I decided I wouldn't wait until the end unit (and its neighbours) came crashing down with our plates inside and took it off in the hope of fixing it more securely.

Victorian house, uneven walls - the unit was secured with 4 screws going into plugs into a plastered solid wall. A small amout of plaster had come loose from around one wall plug and triangles of it were actually wedged in between the wall and the unit.

The unit had two chipboard battens held into the sides of the unit with small lengths of dowel and the rest of the unit fitted together with allen key screws. The screws went through the chipboard and into their wall plugs. The bottom batten though, was splitting.

I got some OSB cut to the right dimensions and replaced the split batten (I chose OSB because it comes in a 15mm thickness from the DIY shop and regular chipboard does not). Drilled holes, fitted dowels, all fine.

I decided to stay with the existing positions for holes in the wall, as apart from the first half inch of one, they were sound and there were screw holes in the unit I could use. Replaced the wall plugs and secured with epoxy resin and a few bits of matchstick hammered in for good measure. Dried nicely.

I have fitted the unit with 65mm long screws and it looks fine, though at the back of the unit, where it meets its neighbour is a slight V shape not a flush fit (it looks flush from the front and is connected to its neighbour with a plastic push-through tie/screw arrangement). The next unit along also features a very slight V shape, I note.

Along the length of all the wall units (6 of them) they have been fitted so that the side panel of the unit is resting on a small (1/2 inch) groove cut into the top of the tiled splashback. My concern is that now the unit is hopefully stiuck more firmly on the wall, the very end side panel is no longer resting on a groove in the tile at all - in line with the slight V shape, it is away from the back wall at that end.

Is the tile splashback performing any role in supporting the unit?

Is it going to fall off!?

Is it a sign of a bad amateur job, or fine? (It looks loads better than it did, but no load in it yet). Should I consider fitting a bracket under it? You wouldn't see it, as it's in the far corner and would usually have a microwave on the worktop beneath, further darkening the area. Just don't know if it's unnecessary.

Eveything LOOKS fine...

 
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Are you sure it's recent, modern kitchen wall units use metal brackets and wall plate to secure them , not batoning.
 
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Hello. I've no real way of knowing. Just that the Como range is still on sale. Interesting that it's an older way of fixing them! Any thoughts on whether the tiles had been bearing any load? Thanks.
 
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No they would not be supporting cup'd, current fixing method allows for adjustment so they would have beeb flush mounted to top of existing tiles and a cut away would not have been required.
 

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