Laminate joins in kitchen worktop

Joined
13 Sep 2015
Messages
266
Reaction score
2
Country
United Kingdom
The kitchen fitter made me a bit nervous by saying to be careful where the laminate worktop seams are, saying not to leave water over them for very long incase it ends up getting in the gap and lifting the laminate.

They are butted up together very tight and looks like he has put some silicone in between them before butting them up but there is still a faint line you can see where some 'mdf' is visible where the cut hasent been mega clean (im talking 1mm thick max)

Im wondering if there is anything i can put there to reduce any potential change of warping later down the line if i forget to wipe water off the seam? Or am i worrying over nothing?

Theres no 'gap' to fill as such but could i use one of them wax crayons on the thin mdf line to protect it better?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
16 Jun 2006
Messages
7,259
Reaction score
1,432
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
He cut the worktops rather than using a router to create the joins?

1mm is a big gap.
 
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
10,100
Reaction score
2,400
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
Every laminated kitchen worktop I can recall seeing had a particle board (chipboard) core, so are you sure it's MDF? I think agree with others that a photo would be a great help as it will be more obvious what type of top it is (e.g. post-formed laminate or some form of edge-banded laminate)

Regardless of material, your joints should be really tight with no visible gaps and no differences in level between the two worktops across the full length of the joints. You should never be able to see the core material from above. Nothing less is acceptable.

When I've installed kitchens I've used either a matching coloured filler (e.g. Colorfill) or sometimes silicone sealant (clear or coloured) on the joints to achieve a water tight joint. Even so it isn't really advisable to leave standing liquids on joints or next to sink or hob cut-outs, so in thatvresoectbyour fitter's advice is good. But if you realise that the core material of a laminated worktop is a timber product, that's just common sense
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
10,100
Reaction score
2,400
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
He cut the worktops rather than using a router to create the joins?

1mm is a big gap.
If the worktops are 3mm PVC edge-banded stuff, like some of the IKEA tops are these days, that is perfectly feasible if you are using something like a Festool rail saw. The ends of the edge banding can be mitred with a chisel to form a tight corner - but you still shouldn't see any core stock

Edit: Now I'm wondering if he's left the edge banding in the joint and just siliconed it. Surely not?
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Top