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Has anybody come across this:
1652967066478.png
It's about 3mm thick with a plastic layer top and bottom with a middle layer that looks like glass fibre but it cuts quite nicely with a 24TPI hack saw (all I had to hand) with a softer dust than resin.
The grooved edges just lay on each other as opposed to clicking in so I assume it needs to be glued down.

I picked up several offcuts from a skip to use for a completely unrelated job and wondered how it works for flooring as I'm about to build a porch. A fairly quick google search has so far only found the 8mm thick products.
 
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I'm not a floorer, but that looks a lot like the LVT (luxury vinyl tile) flooring you see getting installed on domestic and light commercial jobs. Generally about 2 to 5mm thick, click type joining. Amtico LVT certainly has a fibreglass core layer in it and seems good for damp environments as it's often used in bathrooms. Is it rubbery?
 
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I'm not a floorer, but that looks a lot like the LVT (luxury vinyl tile) flooring you see getting installed on domestic and light commercial jobs. Generally about 2 to 5mm thick, click type joining. Amtico LVT certainly has a fibreglass core layer in it and seems good for damp environments as it's often used in bathrooms. Is it rubbery?
The joints dont click at all
When I cut it and the end drops the plastic top or bottom layer will stretch quite a way and shrink back too so I'd say yes it is rubbery.
It's something like this shape (but not accurate).
1652970332869.png
 
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That Looks like Click System LVT, it has a bit of a reputation in the professional trade and perhaps lends itself to the DIY market where finished expectations maybe a bit lower. Depending on the product it will either be fine in an area with moisture or terrible. Generally to fit properly it needs to be laid on a flat, level, dry surface no matter what the assumption regarding it being a 'floating floor' and the underlay needs to be a firm underlay specific to Click LVT as Engineered Wood and Laminate underlays, even the fibre board, are too soft and deep.
 
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That Looks like Click System LVT, it has a bit of a reputation in the professional trade and perhaps lends itself to the DIY market where finished expectations maybe a bit lower. Depending on the product it will either be fine in an area with moisture or terrible. Generally to fit properly it needs to be laid on a flat, level, dry surface no matter what the assumption regarding it being a 'floating floor' and the underlay needs to be a firm underlay specific to Click LVT as Engineered Wood and Laminate underlays, even the fibre board, are too soft and deep.
Thanks for the reply, a quick google seems to describe a proper no glue, click together system which the samples I have don't do, this is fairly flexible and I imagine it would start moving and unhooking fairly quickly when walked on if not well stuck down.

My local shed is Wickes, they have Novocor. Is it likely to be a similar system, the descriptioon seems to be so?
 
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It may well be but I can’t express enough what a poor reputation click LVT has in the flooring trade even from the big names in the industry, let alone in the DIY building industry.

Dryback LVT installed on heavy duty self adhesive sheet underlay systems is worth a look if you don’t fancy heavy floor prep.
 
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sorry my mistake saw fibre and thought mdf missed the glass bit:ROFLMAO:
 
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It may well be but I can’t express enough what a poor reputation click LVT has in the flooring trade even from the big names in the industry, let alone in the DIY building industry.
As I've already mentioned I can't imagine the samples I have is a particularly heavy duty system. Especially if not glued down which the google results I've seems to show.
Dryback LVT installed on heavy duty self adhesive sheet underlay systems is worth a look if you don’t fancy heavy floor prep.
Would that be adhesive both sides?
 
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The dryback self adhesive underlays are usually loose laid to the subfloor and have a single side adhesive on which to install the dry back tiles

 
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Looks very similar to the polyflor camero loc I have just laid. Doesn't glue down...Just clips together! You need the correct underlay which is just thin foam.
 

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