Large Oak tree needs pruning

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by pockygoes, 22 Sep 2005.

  1. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    We have moved into a house & have a beautiful oak tree in the front garden that is only about 20 - 25 ft from the house - it is as tall as the house! We love the tree but it is so close that the branches are practically touching the bedroom window. The house was built on the site of an old blacksmith so the tree was here a long time before the house was built (1995)

    We had a tree surgeon out & he said that not a lot needed to be done & a light prune (ie taking a couple of small dead branches out & trimming near the house would be £180. Does that seem alot of money?

    What are the options with this tree? The lounge is practically pitch black all day long. Long term - can we keep the tree? Can it be trimmed so that we can keep it or realistically is it too close to the house. The survey did pick up that the tree may in time damage the foundations. It has started to lift some of the block paving next to it. But I have heard also that taking out a tree that size can cause problems with the foundations too!!

    Any tree people out there - advice welcome

    Pockygoes
     
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  3. Thermo

    Thermo

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    first and foremost check with the council to see if theres a tree preservation order on it,which from the sound of it is more than likely.
     
  4. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    Hiya
    I did ring the council & they said not - I must admit I was surpised. Also took a look at the tree again & it is taller than the house - a monster!!

    Pockygoes
     
  5. Thermo

    Thermo

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    first and foremost check with the council to see if theres a tree preservation order on it,which from the sound of it is more than likely.
     
  6. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    No preservation order on the tree - so what next?

    cheers pockygoes
     
  7. Thermo

    Thermo

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    get a reputable qualifed and insured tree surgeon around to have a look at it. if you want to be that drastic with it there is a lot to consider. taking out the tree can effect the amount of water in the soil, as the tree will be responsible for taking a large amount, and if its gone the natural balance can be upset. also taking of certain branches can effect the stability of the tree and its roots, so get good professional advice, its a big job.
     
  8. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    Thanks for your reply - you confirmed what I suspected really.

    I would prefer to keep it if I know that it is feasible to keep one being so close to the house & that it will not damage the foundations. I do know that taking one out can be as bad as leaving one there - so what are our options and what height can it safely be allowed to grow to given where it is in relation to the house.

    The tree surgeon that came out said that little needed doing to it - other than a couple of small old branches being removed & a light trim (as asked for by us as it is nearly touching the house).

    Any other ideas/suggestions

    cheers
     
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  10. oilman

    oilman

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    The difficulties you will have will depend to some extent on the type of soil you have. What type is it?

    You really need to talk to a few people who know about trees. Did the guy you talked to have a well established business? You could talk to your local council tree officer. Some of them are surprisingly sane. The local wildlife trust probably can let you know of a local tree expert.

    Can you post a photo?
     
  11. Hazelb

    Hazelb

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    We needed to seek advice about some beech trees next to our house. They are only 12ft from our house. The largest about 15ft away, and we are on clay soil!

    You will need to contact someone who is a 'registered abourculturist' You could also ask to speak to the councils 'tree preservation officer' They may be able to recomend someone in your area.

    The tree surgon you choose should be able to discuss options.

    The tree could have a crown reduction ( lowering its overal height)
    It could be crown lifted (removing the lower branches letting more light in at a lower level)
    There will be other options as well.
     
  12. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    thanks for the replies chaps - the soil in the garden is not bad - not clay from what i have seen while digging & weeding etc.

    I have also got some sticky stuff landing on the car off the tree - this has led to loads of wasps etc. From a bit of research it looks like it is honeydew - produced by aphids on the tree - it is corrosive to paintwork - which is bad news for the cars that we park under it every day.

    I think that I will get a arbourist (whatever the real term is)to come and have a look and will ask them about the sticky stuff - if they know what it is then I will feel happier that they know what they are talking about. I love this tree but it looks like it is going to cost us a few bob!!!

    As the soil is not clay - presumably any trees that are taken out will have less effect on the soil and the stability of the foundations (we have a huge willow tree in the back garden too!! - it looks like that will have to go)

    any other comments
    thanks
     
  13. countygardens

    countygardens

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    Willows are a nightmare for foundations
     
  14. pockygoes

    pockygoes

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    Oh no - not something else to worry about - I thought willows had tap roots that went straight down!!

    cheers
     
  15. Thadd

    Thadd

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    Removing a tree this size will definitely affect the ground and foundations of the house. Unfortunately modern houses cope less well with movement than old houses. You may be able to lightly prune the tree, and repeat at yearly intervals but otherwise you need to learn to live with the tree and remember that it was there a long time before you.

    You should also check the planning application for the house as it may have been a condition of the building application that the tree was not moved. This is not the same as a preservation order.
     
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