Leaking Towel Radiator

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Hi,

I was hoping that somebody may be able to help regarding a leaking towel radiator in my bathroom.

For the past few days I have had a slow, weeping drip coming from the manual valve at the bottom of the radiator. I have attached pictures of the valve and the drip itself is coming from under the hexagonal nut. I have tightened it but this hasn't solved the problem.

The radiator needed bleeding slightly but again this hasn't stopped the leak.

Is it possible that the valve may have corroded and will need to be replaced? Im just wondering if there is anything else I can try before calling in a Plumber.

Thanks for any help or ideas.
 

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Depends how confident you are with spanners etc....
First thing is to trace exactly where the leak is- dry the pipework thoroughly (hair dryer on max is safest) then wipe the various joints with toilet roll and see which one gets wet first.
If it is the valve then drain the system, remove the valve, replace the washer and the gland on the valve shaft, refit valve.
If it is the joint to pipework at the back or joint to the rail at the top then drain system, undo the relevant nut, wrap the threads and olive with 3 turns of PTFE, smear some Boss White or similar on the tape, replace nut.
 
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Depends how confident you are with spanners etc....
First thing is to trace exactly where the leak is- dry the pipework thoroughly (hair dryer on max is safest) then wipe the various joints with toilet roll and see which one gets wet first.
If it is the valve then drain the system, remove the valve, replace the washer and the gland on the valve shaft, refit valve.
If it is the joint to pipework at the back or joint to the rail at the top then drain system, undo the relevant nut, wrap the threads and olive with 3 turns of PTFE, smear some Boss White or similar on the tape, replace nut.

Cheers mate - It is definitely the valve, I'm semi-confident with DIY but tend to leave plumbing alone apart from the basics. I'll probably get some quotes for a call out if it will involve draining the system etc.
 
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That valve doesn't use a gland nut to create the seal, it uses 2 o-rings on the internal shaft, hence the C clip - if it's leaking at the shaft, they'll have deteriorated. Better off just replacing the valve.
 
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