Led down lighters flickering

Joined
20 Nov 2010
Messages
229
Reaction score
20
Country
United Kingdom
Swapped my kitchen halogens gu 5.3s, 3 in parallel, wired off a 12v lv transformer for b and q leds(as I can't seem to get halogens).
However the lights flicker after a time and go out eventually. I bought another transformer, swapped it out. Same problem. Also rewired the lights now with new cables
Any ideas? Am I missing something?
Cheers,
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
26 Sep 2006
Messages
1,953
Reaction score
173
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Can we have a photo of the transformers, and details of any markings. Suspicion is that they are switched mode psus with a minimum load rating which the new leds do not meet.
 
Joined
28 Nov 2004
Messages
821
Reaction score
49
Country
United Kingdom
Anything in B&Q which is Led is unlikely to be much good in terms of quality and especially performance. LED have drivers not old low voltage transformers which although if extremely good ones may work but will always be less efficient and cause earlier led failure. Consider converting to GU10 as the LED lamps are much more widely available and easy to change also have drivers built in. Again make sure its a good one or you will be dissapointed
 
Joined
20 Nov 2010
Messages
229
Reaction score
20
Country
United Kingdom
Will photo today. I have 3 new leds. All flicker. Surely they are all not faulty. Will photo the transformer today. But again both exhibited the same problem. The leds are pretty hot to to the touch when they flicker. They also flicker when only two are connected. Note the don't flicker unless they have been on a while. Not impressed so far with new led tech. They're expensive and dont appear to work!
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,608
Reaction score
2,819
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Not impressed so far with new led tech. They're expensive and dont appear to work!

LED ( Light Emiting Diode ) technology is good. An LED is a small component that converts electrical energy into light

A lamp is more than just an LED element,

Lamps that mis-use the technology and/or incorrect installation create the problems. Mis use of terms like driver, transformer, power supply confuse the matter

A lamp with nothing but an LED element ( or elements ) needs a controlled DC current supply from an external driver, the driver must control the current through the LED element and not the voltage supplied to the LED element. The voltage that appears across the terminals of the LED element ( or elements ) is determined by the LED element(s) and NOT by the driver.

A lamp with an LED element ( or elements ) and an integral driver requires a voltage controlled power supply. The integral driver in the lamp will determine how much current flows through the LED element(s)


Some integral drivers require an input of 230 volts AC, some require an input of 12 volts DC,
 
Joined
20 Nov 2010
Messages
229
Reaction score
20
Country
United Kingdom
Pics
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20200122_090233.jpg
    IMG_20200122_090233.jpg
    124.7 KB · Views: 211
  • IMG_20200122_090157.jpg
    IMG_20200122_090157.jpg
    159 KB · Views: 225
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
10,368
Reaction score
2,123
Location
Poole, Dorset
Country
United Kingdom
That transformer is designed for halogen lamps with a minimum load of 35W. It will not work properly with LEDs.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
20 Nov 2010
Messages
229
Reaction score
20
Country
United Kingdom
Ah, so the transformer needs to specify for Leds. Makes sense! The guy sold me the wrong things. So I need a bulb with the driver integrated into the fitting?
 
Joined
11 Jan 2010
Messages
7,643
Reaction score
612
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Ah, so the transformer needs to specify for Leds. Makes sense! The guy sold me the wrong things. So I need a bulb with the driver integrated into the fitting?

NO. You want a DC power supply or LED driver, not a transformer. All LED lamps have drivers integrated in the fitting. With GU10 types the (internal) drivers expect 240v, with GU5.3 types the (internal) drivers expect 12v DC or (sometimes) 12v AC 50/60Hz. Halogen power supplies (like yours) run at tens of kHz which can damage LEDs designed for DC or 50/60Hz.
 
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,608
Reaction score
2,819
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Winston..... If the lamp has a driver integrated into the lamp then the supply external to the lamp cannot be a driver.

A driver forces a set current through the load ( LED element ). That current forced into the lamp can destroy the driver inside the lamp.
 
Joined
20 Nov 2010
Messages
229
Reaction score
20
Country
United Kingdom
So I need to take the transformer back to the shop and ask for one suitable for Leds?
 
Joined
11 Jan 2010
Messages
7,643
Reaction score
612
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Winston..... If the lamp has a driver integrated into the lamp then the supply external to the lamp cannot be a driver.

A driver forces a set current through the load ( LED element ). That current forced into the lamp can destroy the driver inside the lamp.

If you say so. So you are saying a driver is a constant current device? What is often sold as a driver is generally a DC power supply (constant voltage).
 
Sponsored Links
Top