Led down lighters flickering

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So I need to take the transformer back to the shop and ask for one suitable for Leds?

Yes, but what you have is a switch mode power supply. What you need is a 12v power supply for LEDs.

Like this one
upload_2020-1-21_16-9-21.png
 
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So you are saying a driver is a constant current device?

I am saying a driver controls the current, it may be constant ( preset ) or it may be variable when dimming of the LED element is required

What is often sold as a driver is generally a DC power supply (constant voltage).

If a DC power supply (constant voltage = Vo) is connected to an LED element then either

(1) the LED element will not light if Vo is below the LED's forward voltage
(2) the LED element will burn out if Vo is higher than the LED'd forward voltage and there is no current limiting in the power supply
 
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So what's the difference between these electrically?
The transformer I have works some of the time and flickers some of the time.

The SWITCH MODE POWER SUPPLY (not transformer) you have operates at tens of kHz AC. It is designed for halogen lamps ONLY.
The one I pictured operates at 12v DC. It is designed for LEDs.

As I have already said GU5.3 LEDs are designed (usually labelled even) DC or 50/60Hz AC.
 
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Update, went back to the shop, well known electrical factors, refused to take it back, no led drivers in stock and expensive so swapped them out for mains GU10s. :)
 
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Update, went back to the shop, well known electrical factors, refused to take it back, no led drivers in stock and expensive so swapped them out for mains GU10s. :)

OK, but legally under the consumer rights act the shop has to take it back as it was mis sold and not fit for purpose. Did you point this out to the manager and if not why not?

One of the advantages of buying at places like B & Q is you don't get this sort of hassle, they have a 45 day return policy.
 
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OK, but legally under the consumer rights act the shop has to take it back as it was mis sold and not fit for purpose. Did you point this out to the manager and if not why not?

One of the advantages of buying at places like B & Q is you don't get this sort of hassle, they have a 45 day return policy.

Yes, I did point that out, the excuse was its been fitted so no exchange.
 
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Yes, I did point that out, the excuse was its been fitted so no exchange.

That is an excuse not a legal getout. They sold you something not fit for purpose. You were not to know that until you tried to use it for the purpose they sold it to you for. I would still take it back again and insist on your legal rights.
 
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