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Looking for advice after 1 year of being in new house

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by snowwaz, 16 May 2006.

  1. snowwaz

    snowwaz

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    :eek:

    Hi guys... Looking for a bit of advice about external paint work (all wood). When the builder walked away from the new build i called him back to re-coat the windows due to a very weak coating of paint, now a year on I have paint flaking off in certain areas. What i'm really after is some form of guidance to the standards that external paintwork should be done...

    How long should it last without being recoated???

    Any help??

    Cheers
    Waz :confused:
     
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  3. skybluescooby

    skybluescooby

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    Suppose it depends on what type of paint was used, what the weather conditions are regarding the site of your house, i.e constantly exposed to high wind, rain, damp, sunny etc etc and most importantly how much you have maintained the paintwork over the past year.
    I have to repaint my wooden framed double glazing windows every year, just keeps them nice and rot free.
     
  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    some people talk of the constant attention that "cheap softwood joinery" needs.

    You could use a microporous breathing/flexible system, for best results strip off all the old stuff that is flaking and redo it with a primer/undercoat/topcoat system by the same manufacturer. Do it in warm dry sunny weather so the wood is not damp and joints are fully open.

    You will probably find that windowsills facing the sun are worst for cracking and flaking.

    I used to think it was a good idea to treat with Cuprinol Clear before fixing, to prevent future rot, so so sure now as it takes a long time to dry.
     
  5. Third_Eye

    Third_Eye

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    Was it a big Building Company that floats on the stock market that built your home or an Independent Builder ?
     
  6. snowwaz

    snowwaz

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    Third Eye: was a small-ish company, not floated!! but specailist in barn conversions.. :(

    We have a fair bit of wind as there are no other buildings across an open field, but our place is sheltered by our neighbours.

    I didn't think i would have to be repainting after 1 year..
     
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  8. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Housebuilders have to paint when the house is ready, even if it's cold and damp. You may be able to do it better. Good dry conditions on stripped and sanded wood gives you more chance of doing a good job.

    If you know anyone who reads "Which" they did a test on outdoor paint in the April edition.

    Their best buy:

    The microporous Hickson Décor Breather Paint Finish is durable and particularly good at resisting mould, making it good for shady spots. It's suitable for exterior and interior woodwork. It's available in 16 colours in one-litre tins for £13 and five-litre tins for £60.

    Johnstones came second.

    Manufacturers seem to change their formulation every couple of years so you can't afford to be loyal to your favourite brand.
     
  9. Third_Eye

    Third_Eye

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    Is your wood painted with wood paint or woodstain ? Also, "JohnD" speaks alot of sense when he explains "some people talk of the constant attention that 'cheap softwood joinery' needs. "
     
  10. snowwaz

    snowwaz

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    All of the woodwork is painted but the only information i can get is that it was a trade paint.. nothing else.. Just wondered if there were any type of standards, eg, BS..

    I can see certain areas where the frame joints are showing movement which i guess points to the wood settling into position and being subjected to the elements.
     
  11. Zampa

    Zampa

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    There isnt a british stand for the quality of the paint...british standards only cover the colour...allthough paints carry the BBA agreement logo...which is basically agreeing that it does what it says on the tin...or its been tested by the building research institute or the MOD
     
  12. Third_Eye

    Third_Eye

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    It can be caused by many reasons with new wood that has been painted. 1/ Cheap exterior plywood used. 2/ Using interior & exterior paint. 3/ Not properly primed. 4/ Excessive sunlight.
     
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