Minigrid review.

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So recently I installed my first click minigrid product, I chose it because it is to the best of my knowledge the only grid system that can put 3 modules on a single gang plate. Here is a quick review for others considering it.

Packaging:

I was impressed here, the modules came in small cardboard boxes similar to those that spark plugs come in. Much neater than a loose fitting bag and probably protects the product better. The plate on the other hand came in a plastic bag as is typical for electrical accessories.

First impressions of modules:

The 13A DP switch and the fuse carrier both felt solid and I couldn't see any obvious design flaws or overdesign. I was less impressed however with the flex outlet, the blanking plug was a pain to remove being held in by very strong clips down the bottom of a deep hole. I stabbed myself fairly badly with a screwdriver when it finally came free. There was also a crack in the cord grip next to one of the screws (which didn't actually seem to cause any problems tightening but still isn't exactly what I would call a sign of quality).

There was substantial depth variation in the modules, the flex outlet and fuse module had considerably deeper blocks than the switch and the flex outlet had the cord grip behind the block making it deeper still.

The labeling on the DP switch was strange, one pole was labelled "L" while the other pole was labelled "L1".

Module installation:

Fitting the modules to the back of the plate was an easy and smooth process, certainly preferable to the tiny and finiky clips on MK grid plus and I appreciate that there are fewer components to mess with. The design on the 3 module plate has two modules screwed down directly while the third is held in place by being trapped behind the other two. None of the modules were going anywhere but the mounting of the third module was not entirely rigid.

Wiring:

I found the advertised terminal capacities to be optimistic to say the least, all of the modules I use list a cable size of "4 x 1.5mm or 2 x 2.5mm", though it's not 100% clear whether that is per terminal or total. In practice I found getting two 1.5mm flexible conductors into a single terminal was challenging (though admittedly the fact I was working at arms length over a countertop probably didn't help), the metal part of the terminal was clearly big enough for the conductor, but the plastic hole behind didn't really leave enough space for the insulation.

I ended up using one of the terminal pairs on the flex outlet for the incoming neutral and using a wago for the earths. I tried to use the other terminal pair on the flex outlet for the earth with 3x1.5mm flexible in one terminal and 1x1.5mm solid in the other (since I don't like to mix solid and flexible cores in the same terminal) but I just couldn't get three 1.5mm flexible cores to stay in the terminal in the conditions I was working under (I probably could have done it if I wasn't reaching over a countertop).

Backbox:

All of the modules claim "16mm - 47mm (Dependant on Mounting Plate Used)" under "backbox depth". I find that claim highly questionable, switch modules may be ok on a 16mm backbox but anything else you probably want deeper.

In my case I had a 25mm box with a "mode" frontplate (regular depth white plastic, not a metal flat plate or anything) and it was a tight squeeze. I ended up tripping the breaker by putting a screw through a conductor when I fitted the plate the first time.
 
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I'm curious, why didn't you just fit a regular switched fused spur with a flex outlet as that's essentially what you've built with the mini grid?

For me I prefer MK grids, you know what you're getting, terminal sizes are generous and pretty much all wholesalers stock the range, I've never had an issue with the clips on them myself.
 
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I would personally not use anything less than 35mm for something like that.

Give yourself the luxury of a bit of space.
 
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They should get rid of the silly 13amp double pole switches, and upgrade them to 20amp, whilst still remaining the same physical size.

It's annoying when you have something rated between 16 and 20amp.
 
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I'm curious, why didn't you just fit a regular switched fused spur with a flex outlet as that's essentially what you've built with the mini grid?
I previously had a SFCU with flex outlet fed from a spur off the ring. This was located above a devlopmnet bench and fed three double sockets (via bushes and couplers) and a german extension lead (via the flex outlet)

Some time later I installed a network switch above the bench and made it an important part of my network.

Then while shutting down much (but not all, I have some stuff that I keep running even when I'm away and acess remotely) of the electrical stuff in my home before going on holiday I turned off the FCU and broke my network. Fortunately I noticed before I was too far from home, but still I decided I needed to stop it happening again.

So I decided I needed to make one of the double sockets live even when the switch was turned off (and replaced it with a red one to remind myself of this), but since the whole lot was fed from a spur off the ring I still needed the fuse upfront. I didn't want the mess of chopping in more boxes, hence minigrid seemed the best soloution.
 
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