More damp problems!

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Right, I have a problem that I wanted to ask about here because my parents (elderly) have forked out a lot money getting this room repaired only for the problems shown in the images below to return only 5 months afterwards!

The room in question is am upstairs flat roof extension to the house and the roof was repaired about 3 years ago. There was damp in the corner of the room (outside facing detached side) and also around the window where plaster was falling off. The whole room including ceiling was finished in artex.

Just after christmas my dad got a builder round (not professional) who removed all the old artex, took out the old timber framed window and fitted a new double glazed uPVC framed window that included air vents in the upper sections. The whole room was replastered and painted 3 weeks after the plaster had dried. I went over recently and noticed these alarming sights around the window and to a smaller degree in the top corner of the ceiling..... :eek:

Wall2.jpg


Wall3.jpg


Wall1.jpg


Wall4.jpg


I was quite shocked to see that to be honest especially as it has looked absolutely fine in the last couple of months but in hindsight is has coincided with the heavy rainfall we've seen in London in the past month and a bit. I was hoping that after a new window and roof in last 3 years there would have been no return of damp issues but can anyone tell me what the actual reason for this could be? The exterior wall is finished in pebble dash and the roof is felt (common flat roof material).

Some help and good advice would be really appreciated because I don't want my parents to throw more good money after bad, and these damp issues seem to play havoc on this room!
 
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It looks like penetrating damp, so you need to check the roof, the soffit (roof over hang), gutters, brickwork and the seal around the window frame/wall junction
 
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There is no soffit as such as it's a flat roof. The wall above the window does up a coupe of feet and topped with brickwork. The roof section is then below that on a lower level. I can't remember if there is a drain pipe running down one side of the roof or not.
 
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Seems like a parapet wall then, in which case additionally check copings and flashings and any DPC which should be just above the roof
 
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If it's possible to safely do so, then perhaps post pics of the exterior wall, and the roof and parapet/abutment.
 
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Looks like an ill fitted window allowing the rain in.?
 
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I won't be able to take photo's of the roof until I am next at my parent's place and I live over 2 hours away so will update when I can. The window was the first thing I questioned when I saw this water damage but I was assured the guy who fitted it took his time. Obviously somewhere along the process something has gone wrong. Now it's in place the only thing I can think of is adding silicone along the exterior edges and maybe even adding some kind of rain guard above the window?
 
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Why don't you engage someone local to have a look at the situation and advise you. Then the costs can be pursued from any of the firms if they have been found to have done poor work

It would be better than piecemeal trial and error. A rain guard and seal wont do anything if the roof, parapet or brickwork are defective

The damp by the coving would not be a window issue
 
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For a start, the window frame seems to have been set flush with the outside elevation face - it should have been recessed back into the opening by about 75mm (google FENSA Regs. )
If your installer was FENSA ( for what it's worth ), he should have known about recessing the frame.

If he's experienced, he would also know about fixing a hood-moulding drip cap above the opening - it will throw off water that travels down the face of the elevation. A simple bit of work that can save him much call-back grief.

AAMOI: For the record, some flat roofs do have soffits.

Dont do anything until you've been and looked and come back on here. Take lots of pics and annotate them if possible.
 
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For a start, the window frame seems to have been set flush with the outside elevation face - it should have been recessed back into the opening by about 75mm (google FENSA Regs. )
If your installer was FENSA ( for what it's worth ), he should have known about recessing the frame.

Yes unfortunately the window is flush with the outside wall! I didn't know about those regs nor did my father. He just did the typical thing he does and get the cheapest "builder" in who simply fitted a new window and plastered inside to make good.

In that respect should a rain guard be fitted on the outside to stop the damp problems around the window?
 
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Have also had this problem sorted at the same time as the kitchen damp. The roof was damaged in one corner allowing water to collect above the ceiling and cause the damp shown.

It's been repaired and I was advised to have something fitted along the parapet to channel the water away from the roof (something the builder referred to as similat to coving). Can anyone tell me what it's called professionally please?
 
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It might be an 'angle fillet' if it goes under the felt. I can't think of anything which would go on top of any felt
 
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