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no electricity in the kitchen!

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by vilbs, 23 Mar 2003.

  1. vilbs

    vilbs

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    A dodgy kettle (i think) seems to have blown most of the electrics in the kitchen. Apart from the cooker none of the appliances work. Simple I thought - the fuse must have gone. Wrong! The fuse was fine - so there must be something between the fuse and the kitchen that has blown. Does anyone have any ideas? There does seem to be a mini-fuse switch for the cooker which has its light lit so it must be working.

    Thanks very much in advance!
     
  2. breezer

    breezer

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    you will find that the cooker is on its own circuit that is why it is still working. Actually most kitchens are on their own circuit too, have you checked all the fuses / mcb it may also have its own RCD which may have tripped
     
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  4. MANDATE

    MANDATE

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    The cooker has it's own seperate cable and fuse.
    The remaining socket outlets should be part of a ring main circuit, or maybe two ring main circuits if your property is large.
    Your dodgy kettle should have blown the fuse like you thought,so
    a. did you look at the correct fuse?
    b. did you actually test the fuse?
    c. Is the fuse 'over rated'?
    I can only think an open circuit has occurred, but how and where?
    I would remove all fuses except the one for the sockets and use a non contact tester to see if there is a live wire leaving the fuse box.
    I would use the non contact tester at each socket outlet to see if there is any live wire present. don't forget the break could be in the neutral and the socket you plugged the kettle into may be the culprit.
    You did not state if the kettle was found to be at fault.
    As you know a socket on a ring main has two live wires fed to it and two neutrals unless it is on a spur off the ring circuit when it only has one of each.
    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
    I'm sure with a little logical testing you'll soon find the cause
     
  5. vilbs

    vilbs

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    thanks very much! I will let you both know how I get on - but in the mean time I really appreciate the time and effort.
    :)
     
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