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Old Oil Tank removal

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Mattatooi, 2 May 2016.

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  1. Mattatooi

    Mattatooi

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    So I have Gas installed for quite a while now but still have my old Oil Tank. I am getting rid of it, but not sure how to remove exactly. This is what connects to bottom of the tank;

    [​IMG]

    What part do I remove, so that oil does not end up all over my garden and patio! There is a small bit of sludgey oil I reckon at bottom of it, so do not want to spill it! The bit going up seems to be some sort of oil level meter? Ive no idea, we never used the Oil once as we converted to gas when we moved in. I am also selling/giving it away to someone so what parts are useful for them?

    Also the white pipe which is running to my garage where old boiler used to be. How deep is this likely to be in the ground?

    Thanks alot in advance
     
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  3. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Turning the gate valve firmly shut should stop the flow......I'd test that by cracking open the union after the filter bowl. If it stops - or is largely stopped - consider fixing a blanking bung after the sight tube, or even crimping the plastic pipe closed.
    Is the tank as empty as it can be?
    John :)
     
  4. Mattatooi

    Mattatooi

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    So you lost me a bit there with all that terminology lol. Gate valve is first thing to tank? what is the union and filter bowl? What is the black valve ? I really dont know how much is in it exactly. Not much I dont think. Pretty sure previous owner took any oil with her. They took everything but the kitchen sink lol. Left me not even lights lol. Do I just turn the big valve righty tighty and then unscrew the plastic pipe from the other bit ?
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    The gate valve is the red wheel thing - turn it clockwise to (hopefully) close it. The filter bowl is the alloy cup thing just before the outlet pipe.
    Dip the tank first with a garden cane, just to see how much is in there first! You can tip the tank back over a little just to allow you to cap the pipe if there isn't much kero in.
    John :)
     
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  7. Agile

    Agile

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    Looks like a plastic tank.

    If it is sound then they do have a small second hand value depending on your location. They are often sold on ebay.

    I was looking on ebay a couple of years ago because I wanted one to catch rain water for recycling. But I gave up in the end because all the cheaper ones were over 100 miles away and transportation would have been expensive.

    If you tip it up towards the gate valve you might still get out several litres of oil.

    Some might add a little to their diesel car each week just to get rid of it.

    Or use it to help start a bonfire.
     
  8. 75pete

    75pete

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    Please do not add this oil to your car, you run several risks, not only is it illegal to use, it could block the fuel filter or do damage to the engine. Best to remove it to a recycling centre. Better to to safe then sorry.
     
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  9. Tipper

    Tipper

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    I kept the 15 litres I drained from my old steel tank when I removed it. Luckily there was no sludge or even water in the bottom of the tank, just kerosene.
    When empty I dragged in on to a friend's trailer and we took it for scrap and got a bit of cash for it! The drained oil is used for garden bonfire lighting and cleaning of oily/greasy car parts, etc.
     
  10. Andrew Firth

    Andrew Firth

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    I understand that this is an old post, but for others who may come across this thread. The information below may be helpful as we remove old oil tanks on a daily basis. Below is my step by step guide to removing an old oil tank.

    1) Turn off the tap or valve located normally at the base of the tank. This will stop the flow of oil out of the tank.
    2) Check to see how much oil is left in the tank, simply looking through the 4 inch intake hole should provide enough information. Even when the boiler stops working, doesn't mean the tank is empty, there is always 50 - 100 litres of oil left below the outlet. The amount varies depending on the size of the tank.
    3) You will need to drain as much oil as possible out of the tank before moving it. You can achieve this by using a 12v fuel transfer pump and several 20 litre drums.

    Not everyone has a fuel transfer pump, so if this is the case and the tank is nearly empty of heating oil. My advice would be to cut the tank in half (lengthwise) lift the tank up at one end and place something under the end so the remaining oil runs to one end.

    4) Using a small / medium sized jug, pale out the remaining oil and pour through a fuel funnel into 20 litre drums until the tank is empty.
    5) Lastly before moving the tank pour some cat litter into the bottom to soak up any remaining oil.
    6) Now that the tank is fully drained, cut the oil pipe and move the tank.

    In relation to disposing of the tank and oil, you will have to check with your local authority (council). Some recycling centres take old oil tanks if they have been cut up. As for the oil which is mostly likely contaminated, especially the stuff at the bottom of the tank you will need to find and oil recycling firm to take care of the heating oil.

    I hope that you found this useful, if you live in Northern Ireland and looking for oil tank service, look us up Thank You



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    Last edited by a moderator: 1 May 2021
  11. DIYnot Local

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