Paint Brushes

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I rate the Wilko's brushes as well. Cheap enough to throw away but good enough for a reasonable finish. Oh and if you want a reasonable finish don't use that s***e water based paint.

Agree totally with the paint
 
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I rate the Wilko's brushes as well. Cheap enough to throw away but good enough for a reasonable finish. Oh and if you want a reasonable finish don't use that s***e water based paint.

Ive been using Johnstones waterbased satin -it flows pretty well, the decorating centre said it has a touch of oil in it.

Im involved in joinery where painting is sprayed waterborne. It sprays with a lovely finish, but brushing is very difficult........brush marks dont go.
 
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You have to be fast when use water based to avoid brush marks, roll doors, spindles, radiators, frames as quickly as you can and you a good sythetic brush to lay off when, try and get as much cool air in the room stops it drying as quick.
 
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Ive been using Johnstones waterbased satin -it flows pretty well, the decorating centre said it has a touch of oil in it.

Im involved in joinery where painting is sprayed waterborne. It sprays with a lovely finish, but brushing is very difficult........brush marks dont go.

I had to use the Johnstones waterbased eggshell a couple of years ago- it is a mare to hand paint, and rubbish at obliterating the previous/base colour.

I don't have any experience of spraying waterbased paints. I don't have an airless sprayer so my turbine based HVLP is only used for acid cat paints and oil based.

I'd be surprised if the satinwood had oil in it. Oil and water don't tend to play nicely. The Safety Data Sheet does however mention propane-1,2-diol (ie. propylene glycol) which helps waterbased paints to flow. PG is the main active ingredient in Floetrol.

https://www.decoratingwarehouse.co....water-based-satin-health-safety-datasheet.pdf
 
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I had to use the Johnstones waterbased eggshell a couple of years ago- it is a mare to hand paint, and rubbish at obliterating the previous/base colour.

I don't have any experience of spraying waterbased paints. I don't have an airless sprayer so my turbine based HVLP is only used for acid cat paints and oil based.

I'd be surprised if the satinwood had oil in it. Oil and water don't tend to play nicely. The Safety Data Sheet does however mention propane-1,2-diol (ie. propylene glycol) which helps waterbased paints to flow. PG is the main active ingredient in Floetrol.

https://www.decoratingwarehouse.co....water-based-satin-health-safety-datasheet.pdf

If I have to use it, I use a mini roller and get it on as quick as possible and lay off with a brush.
 
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If I have to use it, I use a mini roller and get it on as quick as possible and lay off with a brush.

Fair call.

The last time I used it I was applying it with an Anza paint pad ( the ones without a foam backing). When working with decent paint, I can apply a coat faster with the paint pad than using a roller and brush.

The downside is that the pads are extremely difficult to get hold of now.

These are the ones that I use.

https://www.marinestore.co.uk/Paint_Pad_Anza_Complete.html

The above is for the 85mm pad, I normally use the 170mm pad when painting MDF. They give you a lovely finish with constant depth of pant application and regular tramlines.

IMO foam backed paint pads are rubbish.
 
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