Painting or wall papering a basement

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Hi all
We are about to decorate our dining room which is a basement.
It was tanked about 10 years ago.

The previous owners painted over the wall with standard Homebase emulsion which is starting to peel off in patches .

It has been suggested that I need to special emulsion made by farrow and ball or johnstons.
I presume this is an "old fashioned" emulsion with no addatives. that allows the wall to breathe

Is this correct?

Are there any other paints that I could use?

And finally can I wallpaper over the wall?

Many thanks in advance
 
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Most "Contract emulsions" or "paint for new plaster" is breathable. A good one is Dulux Supermatt.
That said if you have any damp you are on a hiding to nothing, certainly I would avoid paper, and Farrow and Ball it has a terrible reputation in the trade for being hard to apply and poor value, they had to admit it and reformulate their paints, but I will not be rushing to pay over the odds for a "trendy designer" paint.
Is it peeling right back to plaster or the coat of paint below?
 
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If the paint is peeling off it suggests that you have a damp or condensation problem.

If damp, then your tanking may have failed.

I don't understand why a tanked wall needs to "breathe". The point of tanking is to prevent water ingress.

Can you post images and explain where the paint is peeling? Hopefully someone with more experience of tanking will be able to help out.

BTW Zinsser sell a paint designed for cellars/etc

"Watertite® Waterproofing Paint has a unique solvent based formula that combines a state-of-the-art waterproofing resin with Portland cement to create a coating that stops up to 34psi of water pressure."

http://www.zinsseruk.com/product/watertite/

I have not used it and quite frankly have no idea if it lives up to the claims. As much as I like the Zinsser products that I have used, my BS meter kicks in at the claim of 34psi
 
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Many thanks for the replies.
Having looked at the price of Farrow and Ball paints I know what you mean!!!

A bit more info, we are in a semi detached - 1865 build in a flood zone. Both houses were Tanked about 10 years ago.
The neighbour who has lived in her house about 15 years said that when her house was tanked she was advised to paint the wall in "breathable" emulsion" ie old style with no latex etc.
she told the people we bought the house from but they ignored her and painted in cheap Homebase emulsion.

Jump forward and we now have the house. there is a damp patch on the outer wall (one facing the road) which shrinks and grows according to the weather. Our neighbour has a similar problem. Ours however, is peeling back to the bare plaster in this patch.
The rest of the walls seem ok EXCEPT a section which is where the previous owners knocked through - imagine a rectangle with the stairs and one dividing entrance splitting the long part, they knocked the remaining part of the stairs through to make 2 rooms. Obviously the two edges of this new walkthrough (I am not sure I am describing it very well) have lost the "tanking" and are bubbling up.

when we had a flood (not related) the insurance chap said he used to tank basements for a living and said the damp was an issue due to the fact there is an old coal shoot nearby in the wall (blocked off now) and that ist poses no real health problem and that again we should use an old fashioned emulsion.

Getting a quote for the renovation work and the decorator said that the problem with new paints is that they contain latex so the walls cant breathe, the moisture build up behind the paint and that's what causes it to peel. old paints let the wall breathe (so I guess the moisture passed through?)

The watertite may well solve the problem?
I was thinking of stripping the paint off to bare plaster and putting a coat of watertite or polycell damp seal then either painting or papering .

What do you guys think?
 
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Seems you have two options, clean off the paint in the damp areas back to bare plaster and paint with breathable paint then live with the damp stains that will come and go, or get the tanking professionally repaired.
Just painting on a coat of sealer is more likely to cause trouble in the long term I would think, but that's just my opinion.:unsure:
 
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Footprints
it may be just your opinion but its well received, so many thanks
I think we may have to go with the first option as the budget for tanking repair is too much at the moment and painting doesn't prevent the tanking at a later date?

many thanks
 
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Just as an update / asking more advice
I am now in the process of stripping back the wall to bare plaster and now want some advice on the paint to use.
I have read all the posts on the internet abut FB limewash and distemper but what I really want is the Holy Grail of paints
A breathable , durable, non marking paint

DOES IT EXIST?

I was advised to use Johnstones jonmat , but was then told that it is a nightmare for marking (they also said F&B was worse) SO was advised to use Johnstones flat matt as its more durable but still breathable.

I have read about earthborne clay paint which sound great but at £65 for 5L it bloody should be.
It doesn't help that stringlady doesn't want any old colour either, so we are a bit restricted on suppliers with johnstones being favourite as they are just down the road.

Many thanks
 
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The watertite may well solve the problem?
I was thinking of stripping the paint off to bare plaster and putting a coat of watertite or polycell damp seal then either painting or papering .

What do you guys think?

Sorry I missed this part of your previous post.

Neither product will allow the plaster to breathe.

The polycell Damp seal will eventually bubble as the moisture tries to make its way out. It can however be applied to damp surfaces. I can't remember if the Watertite can be applied to damp surfaces though.

Another option might be to apply some kind of damp proof course to the affected area. You can either drill and inject Sika (or whatever) or use Dryzone Rods. TBH I might be giving you flawed advice and would suggest that you start a new thread in the plastering section- asking if my advice will help breached tanking or not. Best of luck.
 
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Thanks for the replies.
I was going to go for johnmat as its breathable but was advised to go for flatmatt as that is more durable but is still breathable.
Can anyone confirm that? I have asked Johnstones advice page but have yet to have a response!!
 

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