Painting woodwork

L

LooPrEvil

Hi I wish to repaint my hallway. Can anybody please advise of the preparation needed.

The current paint is water based, but I wish to to use oil based gloss as I believe it be be harder wearing on banisters etc.

I was thinking of sanding and cleaning with sugar soap, is that sufficent and will I need to undercoat again?
 
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Hi - a light sand and wipe down with sugar soap should be fine. I would re-consider using an oil based paint if you are after a pure white finish though as it tends to yellow quite readily if exposed to minimul sunlight. With regards to toughness - I've never seen that great a difference between the two, just choose a non-gloss finish and it won't show imperfections as much. Also bear in mind that most oil-based paints take a lot longer to dry than their water based equivalents. Hope this helps! The Dulux website is a good source of info if you get chance to have a look and the ronseal web has some useful reading on too.
 
L

LooPrEvil

Thanks for your advice.

I found that the water based paint I applied about three years ago to previous oil paint started to lift last year, on the stairs handrail. It was the first time I had used water based paint and I am disappointed as it now requires loads of sanding to feather the edges. I have never had such a problem with oil based gloss. :(
 
J

Johnmelad502

If you use water based paint on top of gloss, lightly sand thoroughly. Better still undercoat, but still sand.

If you sugar-soap, rinse well with plenty of clean water.
 
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L

LooPrEvil

I did not undercoat, that was the only difference, I will give your method a shot. Thanks
 
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Paint peel only occurs with bad prep so like the last post said a good thorough sand and wipe down should do the trick. Even if undercoat is used, it should still be sanded between coats, wiped down and left to dry. Its also a good idea to pour your paint into another pot, that way you stop cross contamination and avoid bits in your paint next time you come to use it
 
L

LooPrEvil

Thanks again for the additional tips. I do not sand between coats, why do you do that, and how do you remove the dust it will create?
 
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Its all about providing a 'key' for the next layer of paint to stick to, otherwise there is a chance it will peel (like before?) Sanding wise - just use a DAMP cloth with diluted sugar soap, obviously rinse the cloth well. Or - if you have a suitable hoover - give the area a quick vac then wipe over. The sugar soap will get rid of all oils/grease/contamination etc so you won't have the paint reacting to anything you may have inadvertently put on it (sweaty fingers and the like!)
 
L

LooPrEvil

I am now well prepared with good advice - thanks very much. :)
 

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