1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Pier supporting steel

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by itsnotplumb, 14 Oct 2021.

  1. Dereekoo

    Dereekoo

    Joined:
    2 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    223
    Thanks Received:
    24
    Location:
    Nottinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You can be so pedantic at times
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. tony1851

    tony1851

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    10,349
    Thanks Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Pedantic!? No; it's called not being reckless when it comes to applying safety factors ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Dereekoo

    Dereekoo

    Joined:
    2 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    223
    Thanks Received:
    24
    Location:
    Nottinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Fortunately I didn't apply any safety factors so I cannot be accused of being reckless of applying any, now being accused of being reckless for not applying any safety factors now thats a different storey. Pedantic or what ;)
     
  5. tony1851

    tony1851

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    10,349
    Thanks Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
     

    Attached Files:

  6. jeds

    jeds

    Joined:
    16 Apr 2004
    Messages:
    4,705
    Thanks Received:
    637
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The PI reference wasn't aimed at you. In order to specify a pier - or know if a specified pier is sufficient - I would normally start at the load it is expected to take + factors for safety and design etc.
    Maximum load for your particular pier might be 50 or 60kN. If your load is close to that then the actual construction of the pier becomes more important. If your load is, say, 15kN, then you have some latitude. (note that control of the construction - mortar, blocks etc. is a standard factor in the design.)
     
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    34,019
    Thanks Received:
    4,618
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    So, its not an isolated pier but attached, and so needs to be bonded to the wall it's attached to.

    However you need to check if the engineer was high on red oxide, as it seems to be a completely pointless pier never mind attached o_O
     
  9. itsnotplumb

    itsnotplumb

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    81
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Do you mean its pointless because the beam can just sit on the wall thats just behind where the pier/column/post is going?

    I know now after a dig that wall on on a 300mm wide foundation. Not sure how deep as Ive only gone down 200mm ish. And the foundation was about 200mm below the oversight. The S/E doesnt know that bit yet.
     
  10. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    34,019
    Thanks Received:
    4,618
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    He's designed a massive pier to support one of the smallest beams you can get, and there just seems no logic to it when there are wall there which can hold that beam and any loads that will be on that beam.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. tony1851

    tony1851

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    10,349
    Thanks Received:
    1,566
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If the short wall next to the 'X' is load-bearing - is it possible to use that? You could get a longer beam and padstone, and use the whole of that length (is it around 900mm long?) to support the beam, though you'd need to slip a loose steel plate underneath the beam to centralize the load on the wall.
    In this way, you would be spreading the load over a greater area of foundation and so avoid building a pier and pad. If the short wall is bonded into the main wall going across, so much the better as the load will be spread more widely.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  12. itsnotplumb

    itsnotplumb

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    81
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ok thanks. I was going to have the beam a little bit longer to go over that wall. (the wall is about 900mm) as extra security. I think i'll have to question the engineer.
    I dont really want to as ive got other points to raise regarding other areas of the build. I dont mind doing a pier in blocks as it wont take long and Ive think ive worked a bond out, it'll mean having 15mm perps though. My main issue with the pier is having to break up the existing foundation which is 300 wide by 220 deep. Just to pour a new pad thats wider.
     
Loading...

Share This Page