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Plastering over chase ( electrical sockets )

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by KSS1977, 9 May 2011.

  1. KSS1977

    KSS1977

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    Hi Guys,

    First time on here and looking for some advice before I start a project of adding in a few electrical sockets into a room, it's a room that was plastered about 12 months ago ( before we moved in) and it's a solid brick wall. I'm not worried about sinking the backplate for the sockets or chasing out for the wires, more the finishing of the job.

    Am I right in assuming once i've cladded the cable in steel that I apply browning and wait for it to go off, then PVA & finishing plaster over that?

    Am ok with electrics and plumbing but plastering is new for me but will to have a crack at it.

    Cheers!
     
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  3. NickB_99

    NickB_99

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    In that case, welcome to the plasterers' forum.

    A couple of starters -

    I don't think you need steel capping if the wires are run in the safe zones e.g. horizontal/vertical of the socket. Some plastic capping is usually advantageous.
    Also, Browning is not so heavily used, Bonding is usually simpler and easier to source.
    I would paint some diluted PVA/water (1:5 ratio) into the chase before filling and allow to go tacky. PVA before the undercoat plaster. (May need to apply more PVA if leaving the chase for a day before using the multi).
    Build up plaster in two layers so it doesn't slump.
    On last coat, scrape back a bit so that it leaves 2mm approx below surrounding wall level.
    Fill with either multi-finish or easi-fill. Easifill has the advantage it can be sanded flat if you're not experienced with plaster.
     
  4. KSS1977

    KSS1977

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    Thank you for the reply and warm welcome.

    Easifill sounds like a better option to me that way I can sand down any shameful attempts!

    If I do use that will I need a PVA coat between the bonding & easifill - or is that only in the case of multifinish.

    Cheers,

    :D
     
  5. NickB_99

    NickB_99

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    Good question!
    Having always used multi, have always erred on side of caution and used it if there has been any delay.
    If you are covering the Bonding after it sets (e.g. same-day & has just gone dark), then you'll be fine with either and no PVA.

    I suspect if in doubt, paint a bit on, it won't hurt.

    I've only once not used diluted PVA when filling Bonding chases and it took so long to pick out the half stuck stuff, I don't want a repeat.
     
  6. jrplastering

    jrplastering

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    i usually do put a quick wipe of dilited pva over the bonding before easy fill, im not 100% sure as to why its just what i was taught many moons ago haha, it wnt ruin anything to put a bit on better to be safe than sorry eh?
     
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  8. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I find easiplast and multi sticky and difficult to flat smooth.

    I use an ordinary finishing plaster, and press very hard with a steel trowel. Chases are easy because you can level the trowel against the old plaster on either side of the chase, as well as doing the same with a broad metal scraper to remove any overfill.

    Scraping while fresh is far easier, quicker and cleaner than sanding down hard. You can then usually wet and re-polish it. If you polish it too shiny it is difficult to paint.

    You can get a special plastic device to screw onto electrical backboxes to help you plaster round them. I can't remember its correct name but it is very useful and easy to get a good patch. I've got a couple for electrical work (I am not a plasterer)
     
  9. ladiesman020

    ladiesman020

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    I'm wondering what type of plaster is best to use on a hardwall chase. About 15mm deep.
    Bonding coat then multi-Finnish or one-coat plaster or patching plaster.
     
  10. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    You need to be more than ok!

    What do you know about:
    * the electrical and building regulations
    * permitted safe zones of cables
    * depth of chases in walls
    * the requirement of RCD protection and tripping times
    * extending/spurring a socket circuit
    * the permitted Zs of the protective device
    * Inspection, testing and certification
    :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?:
     
  11. roy c

    roy c

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    Look at the dates of the posts... ;)
     
  12. ladiesman020

    ladiesman020

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    I'm gonna bump this to ask:
    Why when plastering over electrical chases into brick/block do people use bonding coat then mulit finish and not hardwall then multi finish.
    Also what's the max depth you can chase a metel box into.
     
  13. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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