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Plastering technique

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by andemz, 8 Jun 2007.

  1. andemz

    andemz

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    What is the technique of plastering and how do you plan the job. My understanding is that you apply a rough coat, leave it for say 20mins and then apply a second coat and then flick small amounts of water with a brush and trowel up.

    Sounds easy when I say it like that, though many people have informed me how difficult it actually is.

    So, when plastering how much should you do, one wall half a wall a ceiling because my fear is that I won’t be quick enough to finish a wall and then put on another coat, I worry that it will be dry by the time I come to put on the second coat.
     
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  3. Richard C

    Richard C

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    That’s it, simple really! Seriously if you’ve not done it before you’ll probably end up in one hell of a mess with just as much on the floor. Do a complete wall not ½ & ½ as it will give you problems hiding the join (can be done though). Do one wall at a time & start off with a ‘very small’ wall that you won’t normally be seen. Behind the kitchen cabinets or bathroom wall tiles is a good place to get some experience. 2 coats is the right way but you’re going to struggle with this at first; use plenty of PVA to keep it working longer & start off with just one, slightly thicker coat, you can get really good results with just one coat, especially over plasterboard.

    But before you even attempt it, I would advise you watch someone who knows what they are doing or get hold of one of the training videos there are around, or both. As a newbie, your biggest problem is going to be that time will be against you, you won’t get the sequence right & it’ll be rough, full of hollows & bumps; if it does go seriously wrong, hack it all off before it fully sets or you’ll be there for the next 10 years trying to make it flat.

    I’ve just done a landing & stairwell which was the most difficult job so far with 13ft high walls & all that jumping up & down on scaffold boards. IMO, plastering is 20% a trade & 80% a black art & you will usually find you can either do it or you can’t. I’m self taught out of necessity & after 2 years, am now pretty good but I wouldn’t do it for a living, it’s such hard ****** work; my respect & hats off to all the pros.

    Good luck, you'll need it.
     
  4. andemz

    andemz

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    Appreciate your comments Rich. Thanks
     
  5. sanj.varah

    sanj.varah

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    got a few things to add as i was in your boat not so long ago. then i enrolled on a plastering course at college.

    Get yourself a decent trowel that is preworn, don't get the cheapo £6 ones in b and q, they will give you a terrible finish. also i suggest going for stainless steel.

    If the wall is massive you can put a wooden batten up, plaster to that and then do the other side, i've got a 22ft wall in my house and there is no way i can do that in one go. however hiding the joint is easier than you'd think if you've got a good sander! - not ideal but it works.

    sanj
     
  6. makitaman

    makitaman

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    Good advice from Richard C. Not sure how much you actually need to plaster but try to avoid doing joining walls - wet on wet corners can be tricky, so try to do opposite walls to avoid this. If your plastering the ceiling and the walls then start with the ceiling first - though this is by far the most difficult technique to master. Good luck, start with a small wall first and see how you go. Buy a decent Marshalltown 'broken in' trowel, also known as pre worn, this type of trowel will already have some shape to it and you'll find that the corners of the trowel won't dig into the newly plasterded walls.

    Good luck :D
     
  7. nicksey

    nicksey

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    get a pro in plastering looks easy if i had a penny for everyone who said `i do a bit` id b a millionaire it depends how fussy u r it is an art when the light catches it youll notice the difference
     
  8. makitaman

    makitaman

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    You're right, there's no way a handy amatuar will match the quality of a pro plasterer - despite what people say on this forum
     
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